All posts by shaffems

Summer CSA–WEEK NINE

Cook Field Pick Up, Thursday, July 17, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Tomatoes
  • Chinese Cabbage
  • Onions
  • Leafy Greens (either kale or Swiss chard)

Self-Select Items…

  • Carrots (maybe–depends on rain)

Tentative produce for 7/25 pick up…

  • Tomatoes
  • Kale or Swiss Chard
  • Fennel
  • Hot Peppers

What to do with your produce this week by farm intern Kelly Adams

This week we hosted visiting students from Latin America on the farm. They embraced the rain, and Charles gave them a farm tour. They also helped farm staff clean onions. To celebrate their work, here are some ideas for your onions this week…

Onions are very close relatives of garlic, shallots, leeks, chives, and Chinese onions. They’re high in Vitamin C, fiber, and folic acid. Onions have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects that can be beneficial in reducing the risk of cancer, lower blood sugar levels, and improved bone health.

Onions can be eaten raw, baked, grilled, fried, sauteed, pickled, and more! They come in many different varieties, but the most common are white, yellow, and red onions. White onions have a stronger flavor than yellow onion, while red onions are probably the most mild of the three.

It’s no secret that chopping raw onions can cause some people to tear up. One possibly helpful trick to avoid crying is to leave the root end intact while cutting, but if that doesn’t work, you can find some goggles and put those on instead. When it comes to storing onions, you want to store them in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area. Their odors can be absorbed by apples, celery, and pears, and onions should not be stored with potatoes to avoid faster spoilage.

You can use your vegetable scraps, including onion scraps, to make homemade vegetable stock. Here’s a recipe for a quick and easy vegetable stock.

Looking for the perfect dip to bring to the next BBQ? Here’s a recipe for a caramelized onion bacon dip perfect for summertime grill outs!

Looking for a challenge with this week’s produce? Try pickling your onions to use for salads, appetizers and dips, sandwiches, and more!

Summer CSA–Week Six

Cook Field Pick Up: Thursday, June 26, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Beets
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Collards
  • Garlic scapes
  • Radishes
  • Swiss chard
  • Turnips

Tentative produce for July 2 On Farm pick up….

  • Carrots
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Spring onions

Farm Up-dates…

Next week’s CSA pick up will be on the Institute for Food Farm on Tuesday July 2 from 3:30-5:30. The farm is located about a mile north of the central Miami campus. Here is a link to directions and a map showing how to get there. You just follow Main St. north out of Oxford–it will become Morning Sun Rd. once you cross Sycamore. Cross Four Mile Creek–on your left will be Black Covered Bridge. Turn right on Somerville Rd. and the farm is the first drive on your right about 800 feet after the intersection.

What to do with you produce this week by farm intern Kelly Adams

Radishes are root vegetables that can be a multitude of colors, ranging from white to red to yellow and even black! Most radishes are consumed raw, resulting in a spicy, crisp, and zesty flavor. However, cooking radishes brings out the sweetness and lessens the spice. Radish roots are high in vitamin C, folic acid, and fiber, which can help to promote a healthy digestive system and prevent cancer.  If you store your radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator, they can last you for at least a week.

Hoping to avoid food waste? The radish greens are edible, too! Radish greens should be eaten within a day or two after pick up. The greens have a peppery and bitter taste when consumed raw, but much like radish roots, cooking the greens will decrease the bitterness. They contain high quantities of vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin K, calcium, and iron. They should be stored in a plastic bag with a dry folded paper towel in it to absorb moisture, and then placed in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Raw radish roots should be washed, sliced, and then added to salads, wraps, or even eaten with some hummus or dressing. They can also be roasted for about 15 minutes at 400° by cutting them into equal-sized pieces, tossing in olive oil, and sprinkling with salt and pepper. You can roast them for more or less time to satisfy your own taste.

Here is a recipe for an easy radish salad with a lemon dressing: https://simply-delicious-food.com/easy-side-salad-with-lemon-dressing/.

Radish greens are typically sauteed over medium heat until they are tender and wilted (about 6-8 minutes)  in olive oil or butter, and tastes great with garlic or thyme. They can also be added raw into salads or wraps.

Here’s a link to many ways to prepare radish greens, including pesto, soup, and salads: https://www.thekitchn.com/dont-toss-those-radish-greens-145724

Looking for a way to include most of your produce in one recipe? Here’s a recipe for a nutritious collard green vegetable wrap. https://honestlyyum.com/18667/collard-green-wraps/ This wrap includes collard greens, carrots, and cabbage, but the addition of raw or roasted radish beets and greens would add extra flavor, color, and nutrients. You can also add protein to your wrap like tofu, chicken, pork, or beef from your local farmer’s market!

Summer CSA–Week Five

Cook Field Pick Up: Thursday, June 20, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Fennel
  • Garlic Scapes
  • Kale
  • Kohrabi
  • Radishes
  • Turnips

Self-Select Items…

  • Green onions
  • Sprouting Broccoli

Tentative produce for 6/27 pick up…

  • Beets
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Collards
  • Swiss Chard

Farm Up-dates…

July 4th Pick Up Note: To make way for the holiday, we will have an ON FARM pick up on TUESDAY JULY 2 from 3:30-5:30pm. The farm is about a mile north of campus. If the weather is nice, we encourage you to bring friends and family and take a walk around to see all the new farm updates. More details to come in subsequent posts.

it’s been a wet week–good news for our other farm critters….

What to do with your CSA produce this week by Farm Intern Laura Stitt

The turnip is a root vegetable that is crunchy and less starchy than a potato, they’re slightly bitter in flavor but become much sweeter when roasted! Turnip leaves are sometimes eaten as “turnip greens”, and they resemble mustard greens (to which they are closely related) in flavor. Turnip greens are a common side dish in southeastern U.S. cooking. Turnips are an excellent source of vitamin C, and their leaves are a rich source of vitamin K. Store turnips in the refrigerator in a plastic bag for only a few days since they get bitter with prolonged storage. Many people are unfamiliar with how to cook and/or eat turnips. Check out this article for a few basic ways to include them in your meals this week! Top 10 Ways to Enjoy Turnips!

Since turnips can be tricky here are some articles about the many ways to eat and cook your turnips!

Turnip fun fact: Turnip lanterns are an old tradition; since inaugural Halloween festivals in Ireland and Scotland, turnips have been carved out and used as candle lanterns, similar to how Americans use pumpkins on Halloween!

Combining Your Vegetables!

This week’s CSA box contains a lot of root vegetables that can compliment each other very well on your plate! They also can be prepared the same way which saves you time and effort since you can prep them and throw them all in one pan or pot! Roasting root vegetables brings out their sweetness.

To easily prepare a mix of your CSA veggies, pick and choose any of the following: carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, beets or potatoes and scrub, then peel if necessary. Cut into desired shape and size (fast-cooking vegetables, like potatoes, should be cut larger than slow-cooking carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas and beets), toss with olive oil, then add salt and pepper. Roast at 450 degrees F for 45 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes. Fresh herbs like rosemary and thyme nicely complement root vegetables, but they should be added during the last 15 minutes of cooking to prevent them from burning.

Root vegetable Tips:

  • Store root vegetables (except potatoes) loosely covered in the refrigerator, where they will keep for three to four weeks. Potatoes are better off in a cool, dry drawer or basket (remove any plastic bags!).
  • The skins of root vegetables hold many of their nutrients. Very young, fresh roots like beets and turnips are fine to enjoy with their nutritious skin intact, but older, larger, thick-skinned root vegetables require peeling.

Here are some other recipe ideas for combining your vegetables!

Slice the veggies very thin if you want them ready soon, or thicker if you want them to last longer. Mix with the pickling liquid, refrigerate, and they’ll stay good for about a week. You can snack on them straight up, mix with noodles or pretty much anything else.

Summer CSA–Week Four

Cook Field Pick Up: Thursday, June 13, 3:30-5:30

Produce this week…

  • Carrots
  • Beets
  • Collard greens
  • Lettuce
  • Cilantro
  • Fennel
  • Spring onions

Self Select Items:

  • Swiss chard
  • Kale
  • Broccoli

(check out last week’s blog post for some great recipes for these items)

Tentative produce for 6/20 pick up:

  • Garlic scapes
  • Kohlrabi
  • Radishes
  • Turnips

Farm Up-dates…

Farm staff have been busy during the off season, and the farm is now reaping the benefits. Our solar power system is fully operational, which means the farm’s irrigation system and water supply for wash/pack is now fully supported by renewable energy. Not only is this a cost savings for the farm, but it makes the day-to-day operations all the more efficient. No more walking out to the well pump to turn on the portable generator when water is needed. And no more driving up to the Ecology Research Center (ERC) to plug in our power tools. We also have deer fencing around the whole 14 acre field, which means our new permaculture plantings as well as our crops and pollinator prairie are safe from browsing deer. In addition, Charles has been working with Anthony Smith to build our new wash/pack station–a state of the art green house with an array of sinks and sprayers designed to streamline our weekly CSA production. In sum, we are pretty close to having what might be considered baseline farm infrastructure. 

What to do with your CSA produce this week by Farm Intern Kelsie Newton….

Fennel

Fennel is a relative of dill and parsley, and has a mild licorice flavor. All parts of the plant are edible-yes, the bulb, the stalks, and the fronds. The flavor goes well with other produce such as tomatoes and apples. It’s a great compliment to cooking proteins such as fish, chicken, and sausage, and also is full of nutrients like Vitamins A and C, fiber, and potassium.

The bulb can be sliced/chopped and used in many recipes such as salads, soups, pastas, and many other dishes! The stalks can be thought of as a replacement for celery in recipes like soups, and the fronds are a beautiful garnish or tasty chopped up in a dish! Fennel bulbs will stay fresh in the fridge for around 4 days.

If you want fennel to be the star of the show…..try this Roasted Fennel with Parmesan courtesy of Giada de Laurentiis

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/roasted-fennel-with-parmesan-recipe-1943604

Looking for a tasty side dish? Check out this Sweet Potato and Fennel Hash from AllRecipes.com!

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/229887/sweet-potato-and-fennel-hash/?internalSource=hub%20recipe&referringId=1085&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub&clickId=cardslot%2016

For a hearty pasta dish…Ina Garten has a great Rigatoni with Sausage & Fennel recipe! Find it at https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/rigatoni-with-sausage-and-fennel-3753750

Collard Greens

Collard Greens might actually be considered the world’s healthiest food. These dark, leafy greens are in the same family as kale and mustard, the cabbage family. While they are commonly seen stewed with pork (Southern style), the leaves also make great lettuce wraps! They have tender leaves with fibrous stems and are used in many different styles of cooking. Remove the tough stems before cooking.

Full of fiber, calcium, and Vitamins A and C, they are a great vegetable to use in your favorite recipes! These greens are best used within 3-4 days.

For “traditional” collard greens… https://www.southernliving.com/recipes/southern-collard-greens

For a lighter take…Check out Cookie + Kate for a Brazilian-style recipe! https://cookieandkate.com/quick-collard-greens-recipe/

To pair them with a protein, look at this Herb Roasted Chicken with Braised Greens recipe…. https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/white-house-garden-herb-roasted-chicken-with-braised-greens-recipe-2118473

Want to use the leaves for lettuce wraps? Check out this how-to

Ian with Spring Onions

There is a difference between scallions and spring onions. These onions are planted in the fall and harvested the next spring (cue the name, spring onion-ha!). They look a lot like green onions, but they have a bulb at their base, unlike green onions. They are a bit sweeter and mild in the bulb, but the green parts have a bit more onion-like flavor

Low in calories and full of nutrients like folate, vitamins K and C, and sulfur-containing antioxidants, they are a great addition to any dish! Salads, soups, stir-fry, and as a garnish are a few great ways to utilize this produce. Hint: with the roots intact, place these in a glass of water and they will last for a few days. To store in the refrigerator, wrap in paper towels and they will keep for up to three days.

For a few ideas using spring onion in Chinese cuisine… https://www.thespruceeats.com/fun-ways-to-use-spring-onions-694414

For a quick and easy Potato and Spring Onion soup… https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/vegetarian/potato-and-spring-onion-soup/

Want a breakfast idea? Olive Magazine has a great recipe for a Ginger, spring onion and mushroom omelette. Find it at https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/quick-and-easy/ginger-spring-onion-and-mushroom-omelette/

Summer Csa–Week Three

Cook Field Pick Up: Thursday, June 6, 3:30-5:30

Produce this week…

Ian with the weekly planning board.
  • Garlic scapes
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Bok choy
  • Green onions
  • Chard & Kale
  • Arugula
  • Radish

Self-Select Items:

  • Broccoli
  • Mustard greens

Tentative produce for 6/13 pick up…

  • Baby carrots
  • Beets
  • Greens
  • Lettuce
  • Radish
  • Cilantro

Farm Updates…

A lot is happening on the farm. This summer we have the help of six graduate interns in Miami’s nutrition internship masters program. Each week one of the interns will provide useful information about your coming CSA share. This week Katelyn Jensen prepared Vegetable Profiles with a wealth of information about storage, nutritional value, cooking tips, and urls for recipe suggestions (see below). She also found this great article about unfamiliar vegetables you might find in your CSA share.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelysanders/confusing-scary-csa-vegetables-recipes?s=mobile

Fall CSA–Week Fourteen

Final Fall CSA Pick-Up

Thursday, December 6, 3:30-6:00pm, Cook Field Parking Lot

EVERYTHING MUST GO…

So bring extra bags and don’t forget to return your boxes.

Produce This Week

  • Greens mix
  • Lettuce
  • Garlic
  • Kale
  • Cabbage
  • Potato
  • Squash
  • Spinach
  • Turnips
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Sage
  • Parsley

We will have large amounts of squash and cabbage.

FYI winter squash and potatoes will keep for a long time in a cool dry place.  Do not store in the refrigerator.

Many thanks for a great season. We will be sending out a survey sometime next week to get your feed back.

Fall CSA–Week Thirteen

Pick-Up: Thursday, November 29, 3:30-6:00pm Cook Field Parking Lot

Hope everyone enjoyed their Thanksgiving Harvest! Thanks for braving the cold and wet and coming out to the farm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRODUCE THIS WEEK

  • Butternut squash
  • Turnips
  • Potatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Spinach

Self Select

  • Garlic
  • Cabbage
  • Baby fennel
  • Spaghetti squash
  • Sweet potatoes

Last Pick-Up will be Thursday, December 6, same time, same place. Everything must go.   We will have more of the same things on the list for this week.

The farm is now winding down the harvest season.  I know that Charles, Ian and Stephanie are looking forward to moving inside and starting to plan for next season.

 

CSA End of Season Survey…

Keep an eye on your inbox.  We will be sending out an end of semester survey for feedback as we plan for next season.  We would appreciate you sharing this with family and friends who participated in the CSA, but are not on the primary email list.  Your recommendations, requests, comments are critical to the ongoing success of the CSA and the farm.

A brief note about our season…

This fall we had approximately 100 CSA subscribers. This includes 15 students, who participated in a pilot for a student CSA.  We also sold produce all fall through Ohio Valley Food Connection, an online farmers market that caters to restaurants, institutions, and individuals in the Ohio valley food shed; and we donated produce to La Soupe and the Oxford Choice Food Pantry.  In addition to your tables, this is where our produce ended up this season….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The more I read, the more strongly I have come to believe that locally grown fresh produce can play a pivotal role in creating resilient communities and sustainable food systems.  Paul Hawken’s new project, Drawdownprovides compelling data about the impact of eating a plant rich diet.  Here’s what the summary report says:

If 50 percent of the world’s population restricts their diet to a healthy 2,500 calories per day and reduces meat consumption overall, we estimate at least 26.7 gigatons of emissions could be avoided from dietary change alone. If avoided deforestation from land use change is included, an additional 39.3 gigatons of emissions could be avoided, making healthy, plant-rich diets one of the most impactful solutions at a total of 66 gigatons reduced.

 

Fall CSA–Week Twelve

Pick-Up: Thursday November 15, 3:30-6:00  Cook Field Parking Lot

Come cold, or rain, and even mud, we harvest….

Produce this week…

  • Chinese cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Leeks
  • Potatoes
  • Bunching Mix (kale, bok choy, mustard greens, Asian greens)

 

Self-select items

  • Cilantro
  • Arugula
  • Kohlrabi

 

Extra Thanksgiving Pick-Up

Monday, November 19, 3:00-5:00pm on the farm

Please come by the farm to pick up your Thanksgiving harvest–all the ingredients you need to make your Thanksgiving feast.

  • Potatoes
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Garlic
  • Cabbage

Tentative Produce for November 29 Pick Up

  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Squash
  • Carrots
  • Turnips
  • Baby fennel

 

 

Note we are adding one last additional pick up during the last week of classes on December 6.   Despite the freezing temperatures and winter weather, we have crops under cover that are thriving.  Our fall carrots and lettuce and bok choy are protected and looking great.  Our goal is to keep distributing as long as we have viable produce.

Fall CSA–Week Eleven

Pick-Up: Thursday 3:30-6:00pm, Cook Field Parking Lot

There will be more self select items this week  as our season begins to wind down.

Produce this Week

  • Spaghetti Squash
  • Kolhrabi
  • Swiss Chard
  • Kale

Self Select Items

  • Stir Fry Mix
  • Beets
  • Radish
  • Cutting Celery
  • Cilantro
  • Garlic

Tentative for next week

  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Chinese Cabbage
  • Lettuce

Reminder we will have an extra share for Thanksgiving, Monday November 19 on the farm from 3:00-5:00pm.

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Butternut
  • Potatoes
  • Garlic

Recipe ideas

Last week I made roasted vegetables.  It was easy and the sweetness of the cooked squash and sweet potatoes paired with the radish and turnips was the perfect antidote to the earlier sunset after turning back the clock.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 to 3 pounds root or dense vegetable, peeled if you like and cut into 1-inch chunks or wedges (carrots, beets, potatoes, sweet potatoes, turnips, radishes, rutabaga, winter squashes)
  •  Oil (olive, coconut or grapeseed)
  •  Salt and pepper
  •  Fried eggs and/or plain yogurt
  •  Fresh herbs, torn or chopped

PREPARATION

  1. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Toss vegetables with oil, salt, and pepper. Roast, 30 minutes to an hour, stirring at least once or twice during roasting for even cooking and browning.
  2. Serve with fried eggs and/or yogurt, ground black pepper and plenty of torn herbs on top.