All posts by shaffems

SUMMER CSA 2020– WEEK 4

Cook Field Pick-Up, Thurs., June 11, 3:30-6:00pm

Produce this week…

  • Chard (double share)
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce heads
  • Spring onions
  • Turnips (topless)

Tentative produce list for 6/18…

  • Cut lettuce
  • Green onions
  • Kale

Farm updates…

Be prepared for a couple more weeks of spring greens. Charles has been busy planting. This week he seeded sweet corn, summer squash, carrots, and beets. Expect broccoli and cabbage soon. We are now in full irrigation mode because of the hot weather.

What to do with your farm produce this week by Hannah Brown

Are spring onions the same thing as green onions (scallions)? The simple answer is no! While they are very similar in appearance, spring onions have bulbs at their base. Green onion plants will never produce bulbs. They are both members of the Allium plant genus, which also includes garlic, chives, leeks, and shallots. This group of plants is well-known for its pungent flavor and smell. This is caused by cysteine sulfides and other related compounds produced by these plants. Flavor potency actually depends on the sulfate levels within the soil they are grown in. Sulfur-free farming of Allium plants will result in a loss of this characteristic flavor. 

Spring onions are typically harvested in the springtime, which is where their name comes from. Due to their early harvest, the immature bulbs provide a more tender, milder onion flavor compared to a fully mature onion. You can incorporate them into your recipes just like you would with a regular onion. They can be enjoyed as a whole plant (raw, roasted, grilled, etc.) or the bulb can be cut off and consumed like a pearl onion. Nutritionally, they are a great source of vitamins A, C, and K, calcium, and iron. 1 cup chopped will also provide about 3 grams of fiber.

Here are some great spring onion recipes to check out!

Pickled Spring Onions

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/05/pickled-spring-onions-how-to-pickle-onions-recipe.html

Braised spring onions with chives

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/butter-braised-spring-onions-with-lots-of-chives-51161200

https://www.tastingtable.com/cook/recipes/spring-onion-jam-recipe-sherry-vinegar

Summer 2020 CSA–Week 3

Cook Field Pick-Up, Thursday, June 4, 3:30-6:00pm

Produce this week…

The simple pleasure of a bag of fresh produce each week that still smells like the earth and comes with the prospect of shared meals is a wonder. This week, especially, it embodies all the promises of a community that cares about and supports diversity in all its forms. As a CSA subscriber, you are part of a community that connects people to each other and to the place you inhabit. Our CSA includes over 100 subscribers. Beyond the community of subscribers, we also have community members who have donated CSA shares to the Talawanda Oxford Food Pantry (TOPSS); added to these shares the IF farm donates almost 50 lbs of produce each week to TOPSS. We also have interns on the farm who are learning about healthy soil, healthy plants, and healthy food; and volunteers helping farm staff. I hope, as you enjoy a meal this week made with produce from your share, you will think about the living, breathing life of soil, plants, food, and people, and all the interconnections between them.

  • Carleton
  • Chard (double share)
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Kale
  • Lettuce (Butterhead)
  • Parsley plant

Tentative produce list for 6/11…

  • Green onions
  • Kale/Chard
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leaf lettuce
  • Turnips

Farm Updates…

Carleton is an Asian green that flowers in the late spring and so it is seen a signifier of progression from spring to summer. You can eat the flowers on the Carleton in celebration of this seasonal transition. Also, be aware that Chinese cabbage has been soaked in salt water this week to remove the slugs. You might still find some hanging on. This is a good thing; lots of slugs are an indicator of living, healthy soils. Right now on the farm we are flush with greens. As we move into summer and dryer weather at the end of the month, you should expect a decrease in the number of items in your share. Once the summer plantings catch up, things will increase again.

What to do with your produce this week by interns Hannah Brown (Carleton) and Caroline Kerr (Butterhead lettuce and Swiss Chard)

Carleton

What is Carlton? Also known as Komatsuna or Japanese mustard spinach, this leafy green vegetable is a fast-growing plant typically grown in Japan and Taiwan. “Komatsuna” is a Japanese phrase for “greens of Kamtsu”, a village near Tokyo where this plant was cultivated during the Edo Period (1603-1868). It is a drought and cold tolerant plant that matures in about 40 days, so it can be grown year-round. While it might appear to be an unfamiliar vegetable for some, it is a member of the Brassica family. This is the same plant species that produces turnips, bok choy, and Napa cabbage (which was featured on the blog recently!). Since it is a member of this family, it is not technically a spinach as its nickname might indicate. It can be used in a variety of ways including pickled, stir-fried with soy sauce, added to soups, or even eaten raw in salads. Its flavor is described as sweet, with a mild hint of mustard. Nutritionally, it is a great source of vitamin C, vitamin A, and calcium. 1 cup (chopped) will also provide about 4.2 grams of fiber. We encourage you all to try this out!

Here are some links to recipes that showcase this wonderful plant!

Stir Fry: https://www.oishi-washoku-recipes.com/komatsuna-and-scrambled-egg-stir-fry

This is an extremely simple side dish that only takes a few minutes to make! Not only are you going to get the nutrient benefits of the carlton plant, but also the eggs. Eggs are a rich source of protein, selenium, riboflavin, vitamin B12, fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K), folate, and omega-3 fatty acids (if pasteurized).

Green smoothie: https://cookpad.com/us/recipes/243824-green-ginger-smoothie?via=search&search_term=komatsuna

Another very simple, but different way to eat this veggie! Apple and banana will provide added benefits of fiber, vitamin C, and potassium. While ginger does not provide a lot in the way of vitamins and minerals, it has anti-inflammatory properties and adds a slight spicy flavor to this smoothie.

Butterhead lettuce is nutrient rich and high in vitamin A. Vitamin A helps maintain healthy eyes, skin, teeth, and bones. It also helps keep the immune system strong.

Some recipes with Butter Leaf Lettuce

Swiss Chard is packed full of nutrients. It is a great source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, magnesium, potassium, iron, and dietary fiber. These micronutrients are important for disease prevention. Vitamins are important for energy production and immune function, and minerals are important for growth and bone health.

Some recipes with Swiss Chard

SUMMER 2020 CSA-Week 2

Cook Field Pick-Up, Thursday, May 28, 3:30-6:00pm

Produce this week…

  • Basil plant
  • Easter egg radishes (double share)
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Turnips (single share)

Tentative produce list for 6/4…

  • Lettuce
  • Parsley plant
  • Spinach
  • Turnips

Farm Updates…

The wet warm weather is making our beds inviting habitat for spring vegetables and all the other organisms that thrive off of them. Our soil is organically alive, so you can expect to see some chew marks on your turnips and maybe some free riding insects in your lettuce. We are washing the produce, but you might still encounter some mud in your bags. So, remember to wash your produce and store it immediately after the pick up; this will keep it fresh and ready to eat during the week.

What to do with your farm produce this week by intern Logan Wimsatt

Kohlrabi is a vegetable from the cabbage family that was originally
bred in Germany. The leaves and the bulb of the Kohlrabi plant are
edible and can be eaten raw. Kohlrabi can be stored in the fridge best with wet paper towels inside of a plastic bag. A fun fact about
kohlrabi is that the leaves are hydrophobic meaning they repel water and when submerged in water the leaves have a metallic shine.

Here is an easy recipe that includes kohlrabi and radishes:
https://www.marthastewart.com/1163616/lillet-and-brown-butter-glazed-radishes-kohlrabi
 What you will need:
3 tablespoons of unsalted butter
1 bunch of radishes
1 or 2 kohlrabi
1 cup of white cooking wine
salt and pepper for seasoning

Or try a Mexican twist to the classic Dutch coleslaw with this
kohlrabi and jalapeno recipe:
https://www.feastingathome.com/kohlrabi-salad-with-cilantro-and-lime/
What you will need:
6 cups of kohlrabi
1/2 cup of cilantro
half a jalapeno
1/4 cup of chopped scallions
orange and lime zest

Fun facts about basil. Basil was originally used for its medicinal
purposes with a type of basil cultivated in India even being called
holy basil.

To use basil in your kitchen try a classic pesto recipe and add to
toasted bread, salad dressings, and more!
https://www.acouplecooks.com/best-basil-pesto/
What you will need:
basil
garlic
parmesan cheese
olive oil
salt

Spinach is a leafy green vegetable that is particularly high in iron.
Just like Popeye the sailor man we need foods like spinach to keep our bodies healthy and hearty.


Here is a sauteed spinach recipe that just takes 10 minutes to whip
up! https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/garlic-sauteed-spinach-recipe-1944598
What you will need:
1.5 lbs of spinach leaves
2 tablespoons of olive oil
2 tablespoons of chopped garlic
2 teaspoons of salt
3/4 teaspoon of pepper
1 tablespoon of unsalted butter
1 lemon

Also, if you still have Napa cabbage, here is a note and recipe that one of our CSA subscribers shared.

“The napa cabbage in our share was something new for me, and I was so pleased with a recipe I found I thought I would send it your way. I happened to have some scallops in the freezer, so this Rachel Ray recipe was perfect. “

Summer 2020 CSA-WEEK ONE

Cook Field Pick-Up, Thursday, May 21, 3:30-6:00pm

Produce this week…

  • Leaf lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Salad turnips
  • Green Onions
  • Napa Cabbage ( double shares)

Tentative produce list for 5/28…

  • Lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Green onions
  • Salad turnips
  • Basil or parsley plant

Farm Updates…

Welcome to the start of the CSA season. Although the rest of the university has been working remotely, farm staff have been busy in the field for the past two months. The farm is bustling, however the heavy frost last week has slowed the growth of some of our early crops. As you can see from the produce list for this week and the tentative list for next week, we will be distributing spring greens and early season vegetables. Once it starts to warm up you can expect some new produce in your shares.

We also want to welcome our dietetics interns. The Institute for Food serves as an internship field site for the Master’s program in nutrition and dietetics. Over the course of the summer students in program will work on the farm and provide recipes and information about the produce you will receive each week. This is a wonderful opportunity for students to get hands-on experience learning about sustainable agriculture while sharing their knowledge about nutrition and healthy eating with our CSA subscribers.

What to do with your farm produce this week by intern Lauren Murray; photos courtesy of intern Logan Wimsatt

Napa cabbage is a new addition to the double share CSA this week! Napa cabbage is also referred to as Chinese cabbage, and it is derived from the Japanese word “nappa” meaning “leafy green.” Traditionally used in Asian cuisine, this crispy cabbage is tender when cooked, and it has a mild flavor that pairs well with the strength of onions and garlic. This hardy cabbage can withstand the cold, is easy to grow, and has been successfully grown and harvested on the International Space Station! To store cabbage safely, keep your cabbage in the fridge in the vegetable crisper drawer. Be aware that cabbage produces a pungent odor overtime, but they can last in the fridge for up to 3-4 weeks. Ensure that you thoroughly rinse your cabbage and remove the bottom stem prior to cooking. Enjoy this nutritious vegetable in stir fries, noodle dishes, or as a wrap for spring rolls.

For a quick and easy dish, try this stir fried cabbage salad recipe with spicy peppers and soy sauce: https://omnivorescookbook.com/fried-cabbage/

Did you know that turnips can be used as a low-carb and low-calorie alternative to mashed potatoes? Here is an easy to make sweet mashed turnips:

https://www.thespruceeats.com/mashed-turnips-recipe-101858

And lastly, here is a fresh salad recipe to use up your lettuce and spinach! https://www.recipetips.com/recipe-cards/t–161252/spinach-and-fruit-lettuce-salad.asp

FALL CSA–WEEK FOURTEEN

Cook Field Pick-Up, Thursday, Dec. 5, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce List–Last Pick-Up of the Season…

  • Baby Cabbage
  • Beets
  • Bok Choy
  • Carleton
  • Chinese Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Leeks
  • Radish (Daikon)
  • Winter Squash

Farm Up-dates…

Thank you for a great season! We appreciate all your support and hope you have a festive winter holiday. Don’t forget to stop by our pop-up holiday sale in the Armstrong Center atrium on Friday, December 6, to get farm gift boxes and bee posters. Spread the word to your friends as well.

Bring extra bags today. We will be distributing everything we have since this is the last pick-up of the season. Remember to return any cropboxes you might have hanging around; or you can drop them off at the farm. FYI the winter squash will keep for a long time on your kitchen counter or cabinet. This is a great week for stir fry.

Fall CSA–WEEK THIRTEEN

Cook Field Pick-up, Thursday, Nov. 21, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Acorn squash
  • Beets
  • Garlic
  • Green onions
  • Spaghetti squash
  • Spinach

Self-select items…

  • Carleton
  • Kale (green curly)
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Squash (assorted)
  • Turnips

Thanksgiving Week Produce–ON FARM PICK UP

Monday, November 25, 3:30-5:30pm.

  • Asian cabbage (baby)
  • Beets
  • Cabbage (baby)
  • Carleton
  • Garlic
  • Green onions
  • Leeks
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Sage
  • Squash

Farm up-dates…

We will be having a holiday sale on December 6 from 10am to 4pm in the Armstrong Student Center to celebrate a bountiful season. You can reserve a gift basket with Oxford Local salsa and marinara and garlic from the farm, or a bee poster celebrating Lorenzo Langstroth, “the father of American Bee Keeping,” at the CSA pick up this afternoon. These gifts will also be available at the On Farm Thanksgiving Pick Up on Monday, November 25.

What to do with your produce this week…

Check out the Food Network array of recipes for preparing spaghetti squash. https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/photos/top-spaghetti-squash-recipes

FALL CSA–WEEK TWELVE

Cook Field Pick-up, Thursday, Nov. 16, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Carleton
  • Daikon radish
  • Delicata squash
  • Kolhrabi
  • Spaghetti squash

Self-select items…

  • Beets
  • Bok choy
  • Jalapeño peppers
  • Russian kale
  • Tomatoes

Tentative list of produce for Nov. 21

  • Beets
  • Carleton
  • Green onions
  • Kale
  • Winter squash

Farm updates…

We just got a new batch of salsa and marinara sauce from our harvest this season. We will be selling our few remaining jars of salsa and marinara from last season at a discount. Bring cash or a check if you want to stock up. Also, Stephanie will be putting together some farm gift boxes for the holidays. We will be selling gift boxes and bee posters in Armstrong Center on Friday December 6 between 10am and 4pm in the atrium. Please spread the word.

What to do with your produce this week

From my perspective kohlrabi blends the earthiness of fall vegetables with the juicy crispness of apples. I like it peeled and sliced into matchsticks for a snack or to add to a salad. But, it can also be cooked. Here is a link from Kitchen.com that provides some alternative ways to cook kohlrabi. If you still have a butternut squash from last week, you might try the roasted kohlrabi and butternut squash.

ROASTED KOHLRABI AND BUTTERNUT SQUASH
http://www.gourmet.com.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/recipes/2000s/2006/11/roasted-kohlrabi.html

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 medium kohlrabi (2 1/4 lb with greens or 1 3/4 lb without)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 1/2 lb butternut squash

PREPARATION

  1. Put oven rack just below middle position and put baking pan on rack, then preheat oven to 450°F. (If roasting vegetables along with turkey, preheat pan for 15 minutes while turkey roasts, then roast vegetables underneath turkey.)
  2. Trim and peel kohlrabi, then cut into 3/4-inch pieces. Toss kohlrabi with 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper in a bowl. Transfer kohlrabi to preheated pan in oven and roast 15 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, peel butternut squash, then quarter lengthwise, seed, and cut into 3/4-inch pieces. Toss squash with remaining 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper in same bowl.
  4. Stir kohlrabi, turning it, then push it to one side of pan.
  5. Add squash to opposite side of pan and roast, stirring and turning squash over halfway through roasting, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned, about 30 minutes total (after squash is added).
    Toss vegetables to combine and transfer to a dish.

FALL CSA–WEEK ELEVEN

Cook Field Pick-up, Thursday, Nov. 7, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Bok Choy
  • Butternut squash
  • Garlic
  • Kale (Red Russet)
  • Potatoes

Self-select items…

  • Beets
  • Broccoli leaves
  • Lettuce
  • Winter squash (misc.)
  • Radish (Daikon)
  • Red onions
  • Tomatoes

Tentative list for November 14

  • Carleton
  • Delicata squash
  • Kohlrabi
  • Radish
  • Spaghetti squash
  • Spinach
  • Turnips
  • Tomatoes–green (maybe)

Farm updates…

We have our row covers in place for the cold weather this week and we are planning for the final few pick ups this semester. To help you plan for Thanksgiving, here is a list of what we are planning to have for our on farm pick-up, Monday, November 25: beets, carrots, garlic, leeks, potatoes, white onions, winter squash, and sage.

What to do with your produce this week

https://www.tastecooking.com/recipes/kale-salad-started/

Try this Kale Salad from Joshua McFadden.

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch kale (thick ribs cut out)
  • ½ garlic clove, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup finely grated Pecorino Romano cheese, plus more to finish
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried chile flakes
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ cup dried breadcrumbs 

Preparation

1. Stack several kale leaves on top of one another and roll them up into a tight cylinder. With a sharp knife, slice crosswise into very thin ribbons, about 1/₁₆ inch wide (this is called a chiffonade). Put the kale in a salad spinner, rinse in cool water and spin until completely dry. Pile the kale into a bowl.

2. Put the chopped garlic on a cutting board and mince it even more until you have a paste (you can sort of smash and scrape the garlic with the side of the knife as well). Transfer the garlic to a small bowl, add ¼ cup pecorino, a healthy glug of olive oil, the lemon juice, chile flakes, ¼ teaspoon salt and plenty of twists of black pepper; whisk to combine.

3. Pour the dressing over the kale and toss well to thoroughly combine (you can use your clean hands for this, to be efficient). Taste and adjust with more lemon, salt, chile flakes or black pepper. Let the salad sit for about 5 minutes so the kale softens slightly. Top with the breadcrumbs, shower with more cheese, and drizzle with more oil.

FALL CSA–WEEK TEN

Cook Field Pick-up, Thursday, Oct. 31, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Beets
  • Kale
  • Leaf Broccoli
  • Lettuce
  • Onions
  • Spaghetti squash

Self-select items…

  • Eggplant
  • Heirloom tomatoes
  • Peppers
  • Radish
  • Sunflower heads (birds)
  • Winter squash (misc.)

Tentative produce list for November 7…

  • Butternut squash
  • Greens
  • Potatoes
  • Radish
  • Turnips

Farm updates…

We are expecting a killing freeze tonight and into the weekend. The farm staff will be covering beds with row cover to protect produce not yet harvested. The change in weather is a signal that the end of the season is coming. We will still have things like kale, spinach, green onions, winter squash and potatoes in our final weeks of the CSA. But, be aware that as the weather changes, the list of produce each week could change dramatically.

Also, you may have started thinking about Thanksgiving. We will have an on farm pick up on Monday, November 25 from 3:30 to 5:30pm. This is tentatively the second to last CSA pick up of the season. For these final pick ups we will be offering all the produce that is still available.

What to do with your produce this week…

From a Pleasant Little Kitchen https://apleasantlittlekitchen.com/2015/11/17/roasted-beets-and-radishes-with-goat-cheese/

Roasted beets and radishes with goat cheese

Ingredients

  • 3 cups beets, peeled and diced into bite sized pieces
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 cups radishes, sliced (save the leaves)
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1/4 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro leaves, plus more for topping
  • 1/4 cup chopped radish leaves, plus more for topping
  • 2 ounces goat cheese, plus more for topping

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. In a medium-sized bowl, toss the beets with the olive oil and 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
  3. Place on a rimmed baking sheet and roast for 20 minutes.
  4. Toss the radishes in the same medium-sized bowl with 1/4 teaspoon of salt.
  5. After the beets have cooked for 20 minutes, add the radishes to the baking sheet. Stir well to coat with olive oil and incorporate with the beets.
  6. Roast for an additional 20 minutes, stirring after 10 minutes.
  7. Remove from the oven, spritz the vegetables with lime juice and vinegar. Then add the cilantro and radish leaves. Stir.
  8. Transfer the vegetables into the medium-sized bowl, add the goat cheese and stir to combine. Serve warm or at room temperature topped with additional leaves and goat cheese.

FALL CSA–WEEK NINE

Cook Field Pick-Up, Thursday, Oct 24, 3:30-5:30pm

Produce this week…

  • Acorn Squash
  • Arugula
  • Cabbage
  • Carleton (like Bok Choy)
  • Garlic
  • Greens
  • Radish

Self-select items…

  • Fall Decoration Squash
  • Eggplant
  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Turnips

Tentative produce list for 10/30…

  • Chard
  • Green onions
  • New beets
  • Spinach
  • Winter squash (Delicata)

What to do with your produce this week…

We will have a new variety of radish this week–Daikon. They have incredible health benefits. Here is a link that provides information and some recipes. https://www.ecowatch.com/daikon-radish-2641025634.html .

Also, lots to do with acorn squash–stuff them, make soup, or mix with other fall veggies . Here is a really easy roasted acorn squash recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 acorn squash
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 3 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 375F.
  • Wash the squash well, then dry with a towel.
  • Trim the top and bottom off each squash, then cut in half from top to bottom.
  • Use a spoon to remove the inner seeds and strings.
  • Lay each acorn squash half on its flat side, and cut into 1-inch thick slices.
  • Melt together the maple syrup, butter, cinnamon, cloves, and salt. Stir well with a spoon.
  • Place the acorn squash slices on a rimmed sheet pan in a single layer, then brush the maple butter onto both sides of the squash.
  • Roast the squash for 25 minutes on the first side, then flip each slice over and bake for another 15-20 minutes, until caramelized and soft.