Summer CSA–Week Four

Cook Field Pick Up: Thursday, June 13, 3:30-5:30

Produce this week…

  • Carrots
  • Beets
  • Collard greens
  • Lettuce
  • Cilantro
  • Fennel
  • Spring onions

Self Select Items:

  • Swiss chard
  • Kale
  • Broccoli

(check out last week’s blog post for some great recipes for these items)

Tentative produce for 6/20 pick up:

  • Garlic scapes
  • Kohlrabi
  • Radishes
  • Turnips

Farm Up-dates…

Farm staff have been busy during the off season, and the farm is now reaping the benefits. Our solar power system is fully operational, which means the farm’s irrigation system and water supply for wash/pack is now fully supported by renewable energy. Not only is this a cost savings for the farm, but it makes the day-to-day operations all the more efficient. No more walking out to the well pump to turn on the portable generator when water is needed. And no more driving up to the Ecology Research Center (ERC) to plug in our power tools. We also have deer fencing around the whole 14 acre field, which means our new permaculture plantings as well as our crops and pollinator prairie are safe from browsing deer. In addition, Charles has been working with Anthony Smith to build our new wash/pack station–a state of the art green house with an array of sinks and sprayers designed to streamline our weekly CSA production. In sum, we are pretty close to having what might be considered baseline farm infrastructure. 

What to do with your CSA produce this week by Farm Intern Kelsie Newton….

Fennel

Fennel is a relative of dill and parsley, and has a mild licorice flavor. All parts of the plant are edible-yes, the bulb, the stalks, and the fronds. The flavor goes well with other produce such as tomatoes and apples. It’s a great compliment to cooking proteins such as fish, chicken, and sausage, and also is full of nutrients like Vitamins A and C, fiber, and potassium.

The bulb can be sliced/chopped and used in many recipes such as salads, soups, pastas, and many other dishes! The stalks can be thought of as a replacement for celery in recipes like soups, and the fronds are a beautiful garnish or tasty chopped up in a dish! Fennel bulbs will stay fresh in the fridge for around 4 days.

If you want fennel to be the star of the show…..try this Roasted Fennel with Parmesan courtesy of Giada de Laurentiis

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/roasted-fennel-with-parmesan-recipe-1943604

Looking for a tasty side dish? Check out this Sweet Potato and Fennel Hash from AllRecipes.com!

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/229887/sweet-potato-and-fennel-hash/?internalSource=hub%20recipe&referringId=1085&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub&clickId=cardslot%2016

For a hearty pasta dish…Ina Garten has a great Rigatoni with Sausage & Fennel recipe! Find it at https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/rigatoni-with-sausage-and-fennel-3753750

Collard Greens

Collard Greens might actually be considered the world’s healthiest food. These dark, leafy greens are in the same family as kale and mustard, the cabbage family. While they are commonly seen stewed with pork (Southern style), the leaves also make great lettuce wraps! They have tender leaves with fibrous stems and are used in many different styles of cooking. Remove the tough stems before cooking.

Full of fiber, calcium, and Vitamins A and C, they are a great vegetable to use in your favorite recipes! These greens are best used within 3-4 days.

For “traditional” collard greens… https://www.southernliving.com/recipes/southern-collard-greens

For a lighter take…Check out Cookie + Kate for a Brazilian-style recipe! https://cookieandkate.com/quick-collard-greens-recipe/

To pair them with a protein, look at this Herb Roasted Chicken with Braised Greens recipe…. https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/white-house-garden-herb-roasted-chicken-with-braised-greens-recipe-2118473

Want to use the leaves for lettuce wraps? Check out this how-to

Ian with Spring Onions

There is a difference between scallions and spring onions. These onions are planted in the fall and harvested the next spring (cue the name, spring onion-ha!). They look a lot like green onions, but they have a bulb at their base, unlike green onions. They are a bit sweeter and mild in the bulb, but the green parts have a bit more onion-like flavor

Low in calories and full of nutrients like folate, vitamins K and C, and sulfur-containing antioxidants, they are a great addition to any dish! Salads, soups, stir-fry, and as a garnish are a few great ways to utilize this produce. Hint: with the roots intact, place these in a glass of water and they will last for a few days. To store in the refrigerator, wrap in paper towels and they will keep for up to three days.

For a few ideas using spring onion in Chinese cuisine… https://www.thespruceeats.com/fun-ways-to-use-spring-onions-694414

For a quick and easy Potato and Spring Onion soup… https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/vegetarian/potato-and-spring-onion-soup/

Want a breakfast idea? Olive Magazine has a great recipe for a Ginger, spring onion and mushroom omelette. Find it at https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/quick-and-easy/ginger-spring-onion-and-mushroom-omelette/