CSA Week 7!

 (Ian washing carrots) We cannot wait to see you all at the pavilion on Cook field for pickup (10/19) from 3:30-5:30 pm

This week in the world of CSA food we have

  • Kohlrabi
  • Carrots
  • Swiss Chard
  • Radishes
  • Spaghetti Squash
  • Spinach
  • Cut Greens

https://www.pinterest.com/instituteforfood/csa-week-7/

The full shares will include all of these items but in larger bundles and will also have the option to take additional items at pickup home with them.

The weather is chilly, the mornings have sharp air, the evenings have smooth breezes, the windows are down but the hoodies are on, something is telling me it is time for the trees to start changing and fall to officially be here! As sweater weather approaches I hope that you find yourself bundling up with family and friends to enjoy these delicious recipes with your CSA items this week! I hope that you enjoy the inspiration and have a glorious weekend!

Breakfast

Spaghetti Squash Egg Cups

For this recipe I would suggest also throwing in some chopped peppers, spinach, and onions. If you sautee them in a skillet with olive oil and sea salt and then put a layer of the mixture in each of the cups before putting the egg in, you basically have yourself a breakfast parfait, but with eggs and veggies 🙂

Lunch 

Phyllo Pot Pie

This is a recipe inspired by one of my favorite foods of all time. It is called pita, and it is a Bosnian favorite. My grandmother makes it with spinach all of the time and her own homemade phyllo dough, but I do not have that loving grandmotherly touch to excel in all cooking areas so I use pre-made dough sheets from the grocery store. I suggest trying this recipe with the swiss chard but if you want to toss in some of the spinach as well that would be lovely!

Dinner

Kohlrabi Schnitzel with Parmesan Herb Carrot Fries and Autumnal Pecan Granny Smith Crunch Salad

                                                                                                          

Before I started working on the farm I had never heard of kohlrabi. They are so cool looking! If you are as curious as I am about this funky veggie check out the fun fact after the recipes! Anywho, you can make schnitzel out of it! Another plus of this recipe is that all of the recipe items are commonly found in people’s pantries. I only am making this assumption because as a broke colelge kid I happen to have all of these ingredients and for that reason I consider myself lucky and so excited to make kohlrabi schnitzel! And then my mind was blown even further by making fries out of carrots and a salad with pasta in it! WHAT?!? This would be a funky fun Friday meal. Veggies are cool. That is all.

OR

Spaghetti Squash Pad Thai

I made this a couple of weeks ago, and as I have all of the ingredients for the schnitzel, I had none of the ingredients for the pad thai sauce. But Kroger came in clutch and has pre-made sauce. I do suggest going light with the sauce however because spaghetti squash itself is a little sweeter and the pad thai sauce is also sweet and tangy. Therefore start with a little less than what you would think you need and increase as your taste buds tell you.

Snack

Zucchini Kohlrabi Carrot Fritters

Grab a couple of these fun little guys and put them in your kids lunch box or in your big kid lunch box to have something to look forward to in the middle of the week. You can also make them into Mickey Mouse shapes for the kids, or yourself, because Mickey Mouse is cool and adults should deserve his happiness too 🙂

As promised: fun facts about kohlrabi!

Kohlrabi comes from a german word that means “cabbage turnip”, in the book, “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth” kohlrabi is described as a cross between an octopus and a space capsule. That one made me chuckle. Kohlrabi is in the same family as kale which is brassica and it happens to be very high in antioxidants! If you are curious as to how to cook kohlrabi, here is a little transcript from the New York Times:

“If you can get kohlrabi with the greens attached, cook them as you would turnip greens or kale. The greens are never quite as copious as the greens on a bunch of turnips, but they make a nice addition to most kohlrabi dishes. It’s important when you cook with kohlrabi to peel it thoroughly. Beneath the thick, hard skin is another fibrous layer, which should also be peeled away. The fibers will not soften when cooked, and they can get stuck in your throat. So peel once, then peel again until you reach the light layer of crisp flesh.”

https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/09/discovering-kohlrabi-its-a-vegetable/

Well thats all that I have this time friends, enjoy the sun, the weather, and the happiness of family and friends this weekend! Enjoy your Friday and eat good food!

Happy Healthy Eating,

Kristine