Tag Archives: career

How to decide between companies?

Originally Posted: March 2016

So, you had a successful Spring ICE, performed well in a few interviews, and were fortunate enough to get a few offers!  Now you have a good problem on your hands: from which company do you accept the offer? There are many factors that can aid in this decision-making process.

  1. First, you should do research on all of the companies who gave you an offer and read a few reviews to learn more about the culture of the firm. Glassdoor is a great resource to find reviews and learn about different companies. By exploring each company’s website, you could get a lot more information about different programs that you had no idea existed.
  2. Second, you should consider the big picture. You should choose a company where you see the potential of personal growth in the upcoming years and the opportunity for you to achieve your goals.
  3. Finally, after taking all your research into consideration, you should go with your gut. Choose the firm that you feel is right. After completing an office visit during your final interview and learning about its culture, you have most likely already formed an opinion. Just listen to your gut and you won’t go wrong!

How to decline opportunities?

Many people often have trouble or get nervous when having to decline offers from companies. The first piece of advice I have is to always remain professional. Acting professional not only gives you a good reputation, but could also lead to further opportunities. You never know who the hiring manager may pass your name to. No matter what you choose to do, handling the rejection letter professionally not only represents a positive outlook on yourself but on the student body as a whole. Our policy states that you have three weeks from the time offered to accept or decline; so don’t be afraid to use this and not make a rushed decision. The second piece of advice is you shouldn’t feel bad for rejecting an opportunity because companies are used to having people decline offers.  Feeling guilty will not only make you accept at the wrong place, but will also leave you doubting other opportunities. No matter whom you know in the company or how bad you feel, you should always go with your number one choice and have no regrets.

What if Spring I.C.E. was not successful?

There are still many opportunities available if things at Spring ICE did not go as well as expected. Many of the companies who recruit at Spring ICE offer summer leadership programs (KPMGDeloitteErnst and YoungPWCP&G).  This is a great way to get involved with the company and make your mark. Speaking from personal experience, I participated in one and it helped get my foot in the door for my internship this upcoming summer. Also, consider making an appointment on Handshake with Monique Frost or Brenda Homan to see what opportunities still may be available. With their expertise, they may know of a few resources that can steer you in the right direction.

Whatever path you are on, there is definitely something for you to do! Always act professional and stay encouraged if things don’t go the way you were hoping!

6 Do’s and Don’ts of Spring I.C.E.

Originally Posted: February 2016

By: Marissa Humayun

It’s here people! Spring I.C.E. is just around the corner, and soon enough, there will be a maze of black blazers making their way to Millett to score that summer internship or job. It seems like just yesterday, everyone was spending their J-term cuddled up on their couch watching The Office or studying abroad in some exotic destination. The haze of our incredibly long break has faded and it is time to get busy! This is such an amazing opportunity to develop yourself professionally, especially for underclassmen. Now, as a sophomore, I am by no means an expert on Spring I.C.E. However, I have enlisted the help of the FSB Student Services advisors for their specific advice on how students should prepare themselves for February 10th.

  1. DO your research on the companies listed. It is crucial to narrow the 224 companies down to a few you are interested in. Have a solid knowledge base for each of the companies you are interested in. Nick Cattin, Director of FSB Career & Professional Development suggests that students look into companies they have not necessarily heard of, specifically B to B companies.
  2. DO take this research and tailor your elevator pitch toward the recruiters. Compare what the internship/job description states on Career Link to your own resume, find the similarities and create a pitch that highlights the best things you can offer to the company!
  3. DO remember that Spring I.C.E. offers many options for sophomores seeking experience. There is a First-Year Friendly Employer drop down box on the Spring I.C.E. Participants page that is useful in your research. Also, Brenda Homan of EY Professional Development and Accountancy Advising suggests that sophomore students take advantage of various summer leadership programs offered by many big names (Accounting students in particular can receive academic credit for this type of experiential learning as well!)
  4. DON’T forget to apply for your prospective jobs and internships on Career Link or on the company’s “careers” website as soon as possible! Monique Frost, Associate Director of FSB Career and Professional Development recommends this, as it will eliminate the question of “Have you applied?” and will show the recruiters that you are very interested in their position!
  5. DON’T forget to send Thank You’s to the recruiters you spoke to. It may sound obvious, but it is a key part to building a connection with a potential employer. Write down their names or snag their business cards and then email them a warm thank you! (Also, utilize LinkedIn to maintain a means of contact with the recruiter).
  6. DON’T stress! It seems cliché or nearly impossible sometimes as a full-time student, but the less stress you have about Spring I.C.E., the more successful it will go for you!

Best of luck readers!

Don’t have time for an advising appointment with one of our advisors? Email us at fsbcareers@miamioh.edu with your questions!