Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Policy

(Student Handbook 1.12)

Introduction (Student Handbook 1.12.A)

FERPA. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, commonly known as FERPA, provides students with a right of access to their education records, permits students to challenge the accuracy of the records and prohibits the non-consensual release of such information except in limited circumstances (see Sections 1.12.B and 1.12. E below). This policy applies to all students in attendance at Miami University. In accordance with the federal regulations implementing FERPA, Miami defines in attendance for first time students as having accepted the University’s offer of admission and made the required deposit. Thereafter, a student is deemed to be “in attendance” during all periods of enrollment, during breaks between terms, during University holidays and vacations, and during periods of suspension. The University informs students of their rights under FERPA by annual publication of the University policy in The Student Handbook and by publication of annual notification of rights in The Miami Student.

Directory Information (Student Handbook 1.12.B)

Definition. Federal law requires the following information be designated as Directory Information under FERPA (34.C.F.R. 99.1). FERPA permits the release of directory information without the student’s consent (34.C.F.R.99.31).

  1. name, campus address, telephone listing, and campus email address;
  2. place and date of birth;
  3. major field(s) of study, including the college, division, department or program in which the student is enrolled;
  4. enrollment status (undergraduate or graduate, full-time or part-time);
  5. dates of attendance;
  6. degrees, scholarships, honors, and awards, including President’s List, Dean’s List, honorary organizations and grade point average of students selected;
  7. most recent educational institution attended;
  8. photographic, video, or electronic images taken and maintained by the University;
  9. participation in officially recognized student organizations, activities, and sports;
  10. weight and height of members of athletic teams.

A student has the right to refuse to permit the designation of any or all of the categories of directory information. Any student wishing to exercise this right must inform the Office of the University Registrar in writing on or before July 15 of the categories of personally identifiable information that are not to be designated as directory information with respect to that student.

Disclosure of Directory Information under FERPA is permissive, not mandatory.  As a result, there is no entitlement to Directory Information under FERPA.  The Ohio Public Records Act (the “Act”) does not mandate that every record created by a state entity constitutes a public record subject to disclosure.  In order for a record to be a public record subject to disclosure, the record must serve to document the organization, functions, policies, decisions, procedures, operations, or other activities of the office. Information designated as directory information does not meet the definition of a public record simply because it is designated as Directory Information.

Access to Student Records (Student Handbook 1.12.C)

Access to Own Records. A student who is currently attending or who has been enrolled as a student at Miami University may have access to his or her education records with certain exceptions that are listed below. An educational record is defined as material that is directly related to the student maintained by the institution. The material is covered by the policy as long as the institution uses it for making decisions about the student or for transmitting information to others outside of the institution.

A request to review such education records shall be made in writing by the student to the office concerned. The institution or office concerned shall respond to the request within a reasonable period of time, but not to exceed 45 days after the day of the request. Upon written request, a student will be provided with a copy of the education record at a reasonable cost.

Records Not Subject to Inspection. The following records shall not be subject to inspection by students:

  1. Private notes and materials such as grade books used by faculty and staff.
  2. Financial records of the parents of the students or information from such records. Information from the Parents’ Confidential Statement may be released to the student only on the condition that the proper authorization has been given by the parent(s).

Non-Admitted Students. This policy does not extend to rejected applicants for admission.

Waiver of Access (Student Handbook 1.12.D)

Students may waive in writing their right of access to confidential letters of recommendation respecting admission, employment, or the receipt of an honor. On request, students will be notified of the names of all persons making confidential recommendations; such recommendations must be used solely for the purpose for which they were intended.

Disclosure of Information (Student Handbook 1.12.E)

Conditions for Disclosure (Student Handbook 1.12.E.1)

Personally identifiable information will not be released from an education record without the prior written consent of the student, except under one or more of the conditions listed below.

  1. The disclosure is to University officials with legitimate educational interests. A University official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. A University official is any of the following:
    1. A person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research or support staff position (including law enforcement personnel and health services staff).
    2. A person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney or auditor or collection agent)
    3. A person serving on the Board of Trustees.
    4. A student serving on an official committee such as a disciplinary board or grievance committee or assisting another University official in performing his or her tasks.
  2. The disclosure is to officials of another school where the student seeks or intends to enroll.
  3. The disclosure is to the Comptroller General, The Secretary of Education, state educational authorities or authorized representatives of the Attorney General for law enforcement purposes.
  4. The disclosure is in connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or which the student has received to determine eligibility for aid, the amount of aid, the conditions of aid or enforcement of the terms and conditions of aid.
  5. The disclosure is to organizations conducting studies for or on behalf of educational agencies or institutions.
  6. The disclosure is to accrediting organizations to carry out accrediting functions.
  7. The disclosure is to parent(s) of a dependent student, as defined by Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code.
  8. The disclosure is to comply with a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena. The University will make a reasonable effort to notify the student of the order or subpoena in advance of compliance, unless the subpoena is a federal grand jury subpoena or other subpoena issued for law enforcement purposes and directs otherwise.
  9. The disclosure is in connection with a health or safety emergency if necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals.
  10. The disclosure is to a parent or legal guardian of a student under the age of 21 of information regarding any violation of any federal, state, or local law or of any rule or policy of the University governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the University has determined that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to such use or possession.
  11. The disclosure is of the final results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the University against a student who is an alleged perpetrator of any crime of violence (as that term is defined in section 16 of title 18, United States Code) or a non-forcible sex offense, if the University determines as a result of the disciplinary proceeding that the student committed a violation of the institution’s rules or policies with respect to such crime or offense. The information shall include only the name of the student, the violation committed and any sanctions imposed by the University on the student. The University may include the name of any other student such as a victim or witness, only with the written consent of that other student. The University will notify victims of sexual assault of the outcome of any disciplinary proceeding against the alleged perpetrator.

Additional Rules of Disclosure (Student Handbook 1.12.E.2)

A record of any disclosures made will be maintained and the student is entitled to inspect and review that record. Confidential information will be transferred to a third party only on the condition that such party will not permit any other party to have access to such information without the written consent of the student. No person, agency, or organization other than those identified in this Section 1.12.E will have access to such records before indicating in writing the legitimate educational or other interest of the person, agency, or organization. Such record shall be kept with the student’s file and shall be open to inspection only by the student, the responsible administrator and his or her staff, and persons specifically authorized by law. No notation is required for access by University employees in the normal course of their duties.

University Policy and Procedure on a Student’s Right to Inspect and Review Personally Identifiable Records and the Right to Challenge the Content of Those Records (Student Handbook 1.12.F)

Inspection and Review of Records (Student Handbook 1.12.F.1)

Present and former students of Miami University have the right to inspect and review their education records. The University will respond to any reasonable request for explanation and interpretation of records. A student may request the opportunity to inspect and review his or her records. Such a request must be made in writing. The request should be made to the chief administrator or designee(s) (e.g., the University Registrar, Bursar, dean or chair of academic department) of the office in which the records are on file. A request must specify records to be inspected and reviewed, the purpose of the disclosure and to whom the records are to be released.

A request by a student to inspect and review his or her records will be granted within a reasonable period of time, but such time is not to exceed 45 days after the request has been received by the department. Records will be inspected and reviewed by the student in the presence of the chief administrator or designee(s). Contested records may not be changed or deleted during the process of inspection and review. The student shall be advised of the student’s right to challenge the content of the records and be advised to review this policy. Upon written request the student shall be provided with a copy of that portion(s) of his or her education record at a reasonable cost to the student.

Challenging Contents of Records (Student Handbook 1.12.F.2)

Request to Amend. If the student believes the education records of the student contain information that is inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the student’s rights of privacy or other rights, the student may ask the chief administrator of the office in which the records are maintained to amend the record. The chief administrator shall advise the student in writing within a reasonable time of the chief administrator’s decision. If the chief administrator decides not to amend the record as requested, the chief administrator shall inform the student of the student’s right to a hearing and give the student a copy of this policy.

Hearing

Request — The student may request in writing a hearing to challenge the content of the student’s education records on the grounds that the information contained in the education records is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the privacy or other rights of the student. The written request shall be delivered to the Office of the Secretary of the University.

Hearing — The hearing shall be held before the Secretary of the University or, at the Secretary’s discretion, a committee appointed by the Secretary, within a reasonable time after receipt of the request. Notice of the time, date and place of the hearing shall be given in writing to the student at least three (3) working days in advance of the hearing. The student will be given a full opportunity to present evidence that the information contained in the education records is inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the privacy or other rights of the student. The student may, at the student’s own expense, be represented by one or more individuals of his or her own choice including an attorney.

Decision. The Secretary of the University’s (or committee’s) decision will be made in writing within ten (10) business days after the hearing. The decision will be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing, and will include a summary of the evidence and the reasons for the decision. If the Secretary of the University (or committee) determines that the information in the education record is not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the privacy or other rights of the student, the Secretary of the University shall inform the student of the student’s right to place a statement in the education record commenting on the contested information or stating why he or she disagrees with the decision.




Degree Honors and Distinction

(Student Handbook 1.11)

General Honors (Student Handbook 1.11.A)

University Honors. To graduate with University Honors, a student must have completed the first-year, upper-class, and senior course requirements of the Honors Program and achieved a 3.50 cumulative grade point average upon completion of the required credit hours for graduation.

Associate Degree Honors. Students pursuing an associate degree are eligible to apply for participation in the University Honors Program. Associate degree students who complete the necessary University Honors requirements will be accorded the designation, “With Distinction” and receive a certificate of recognition. Contact the Honors Program Director at Miami Hamilton or Miami Middletown for details.

Distinction. Effective with December 2014 graduation, the criteria for graduation with distinction are divisionally based. Graduating students within each academic division must achieve the following cumulative grade point averages:

Latin Honors – Effective 2014-2015 Academic Year
Division Summa Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude
Arts and Science 3.95 3.85 3.65
Creative Arts 3.90 3.80 3.70
Education, Health and Society 3.95 3.85 3.70
Engineering and Computing 3.90 3.80 3.60
Farmer School of Business 3.90 3.75 3.50
Professional Studies and Applied Sciences 3.90 3.75 3.50

Criteria are based on the average grade point average within each division from the calendar years, 2009, 2010 and 2011. These criteria will remain unchanged. The grade point standards used for the distinction of summa cum laude approximates the average grade point average of the highest two percent of students in each academic division for the past three years.  The standard used for magna cum laude approximates the average grade point average of the next five highest percent of students in each academic division for the past three years; and the standard used for the cum laude designation approximates the average grade point average of the next highest ten percent of students within each academic division for the past three years, with typically no more than 17 percent being awarded honors within each division.  Once every five years, the University Registrar and Office of Provost will conduct a review of these criteria and propose a change to criteria to University Senate if needed.

Students who graduate with distinction may wear cords at commencement based upon final grades of the last semester of attendance prior to commencement, and the commencement program will reflect that they may be graduating with distinction. Actual degree honors will be recalculated to include grades from the student’s final semester and will be posted on the student’s academic record. In addition, for students who graduate with distinction, the diploma for the degree will designate the Latin Honors earned by the student. Students who earn two or more degrees from separate academic divisions receive a separate diploma for each degree. Each diploma will indicate the appropriate Latin Honors the student earned, using the criteria for Latin Honors of the academic division where each degree resides.

For graduation with distinction a student pursuing a baccalaureate degree must have earned at least 64 credit hours from Miami University; a student pursuing an associate degree must have earned at least 32 credit hours from Miami University. For students who earn fewer than 64 hours from Miami toward a baccalaureate degree or fewer than 32 hours from Miami toward an associate degree, the cumulative grade point average used at graduation to determine eligibility for honors is the lower of the following averages: (1) the average for all courses taken from Miami or (2) the combined average calculated using the grades from all college-level courses.

Degree honors are considered finalized 30 days after graduation and are not subsequently recalculated.

For students who have exercised the Fresh Start option or the Course Repeat Policy, grades from all coursework taken at Miami University will be used in calculating eligibility for graduation with honors. (See Re-enrollment of Former Students, Chapter 1)

Department Honors—Baccalaureate Degrees (Student Handbook 1.11.B)

Students, whether or not designated as honors program students, may apply to complete a departmental honors program in most University departments. Interested students should see the chief departmental advisor in their major department.




Graduation Requirements

(Student Handbook 1.10)

Miami Degree Residence (Student Handbook 1.10.A)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours offered through the Oxford and/or the regional campuses, including 12 of the final 30 hours required for the baccalaureate degree. Exceptions to this general rule are:

  1. Students qualifying for a degree under one of the professional arrangement programs in the College of Arts and Science must earn 90 hours of Miami University credit applicable to a baccalaureate degree.Students pursuing baccalaureate degrees in the Farmer School of Business must complete 50% of their business course work at Miami University.
  2. For the associate degree programs in specialized areas offered through the regional campuses:
    1. a minimum of 15 semester hours must be taken in residence through the regional campuses;
    2. a minimum of 9 of the last 20 credit hours must be taken through Miami University;

For the Associate in Arts degree:

  1. students must complete a minimum of 30 semester credit hours in residence through the Oxford and/or the regional campuses;
  2. only one area of concentration is awarded within the Associate in Arts degree;

Courses (Student Handbook 1.10.B)

All students who matriculated to Miami University beginning with the fall of 1992 must complete 36 credit hours of Foundation courses offered under the Miami Plan (please refer to the Miami Plan regulations as set forth in The Miami BulletinGeneral Edition for additional information).

Students will ordinarily be graduated under the University and divisional requirements in effect at their entrance into Miami University; however, students always have the option of completing, in its entirety, a more current program. Exceptions may occur when changing professional or accreditation standards necessitate new requirements. If a student’s course of study is prolonged beyond ten years, curricula changes adopted after his or her entrance date may be required by the University, division, or department.

Students who have earned credits more than ten years before their planned graduation date must petition to their divisional committee of advisors to validate these credits. The student is responsible for supplying course descriptions or college catalogs from the institution he or she previously attended if credit is ten or more years old.

Basic physical education is optional, and no more than ten credit hours of basic physical education courses can be applied toward a baccalaureate degree. No more than five semester hours of credit for basic physical education courses can be applied toward an associate degree.

Students can register for no more than five credit hours per term or semester or ten credit hours per academic year for Independent Study (177, 277, 377, or 477).

Students cannot graduate with grades of IG, IGY, IU, IUY, N. S. or U. See section 1.3.A

Scholastic (Student Handbook 1.10.C)

A minimum cumulative average of 2.00 is required for a baccalaureate degree. Other course requirements, grade point averages, and the number of credit hours required for the respective baccalaureate degrees are fixed separately by the various divisions of the University. A student must fulfill all of the requirements of his or her curriculum except for variations that may be authorized by the appropriate divisional committee of advisors.

For the granting of all degrees, in computing the average of a candidate, all credits and grades earned at Miami University are to be counted except those in-service courses in physical education earned through August 1970 and after August 2004.

The minimum cumulative grade point average to receive an associate degree is 2.00. However, if in subsequent work a student’s cumulative average falls below 2.00, the student may receive an associate degree if the student had a minimum 2.00 cumulative average at the conclusion of the term in which the student completed the requirement for the degree. The student’s academic record would indicate date of completion of the degree requirement, the degree to be awarded at the next commencement.

Application Fee and Filing Deadlines for Graduation (Student Handbook 1.10.D)

Applications for Graduation. Students may graduate following any semester or term. Associate, baccalaureate, and graduate degree-seeking students are strongly encouraged to submit an online application the semester or term prior to the one in which they plan to graduate in order that graduation requirements can be checked by the Office of the University Registrar and the appropriate division. By filing the applications early, students will be notified of any problems so appropriate corrective action can be taken. Department and divisional requirements should be checked by the student in conjunction with his or her academic advisor. An application fee for graduation for those receiving an associate, baccalaureate, master’s, specialist, or doctorate degree must be paid regardless of attendance at commencement exercises. A graduation fee is assessed for the first instance of each degree application. Paid applications must be received no later than 30 working days prior to commencement to be included in publications. In the event a student does not meet requirements and is deleted from the graduation list, a new application must be submitted to be considered for a future graduation date.

Deadlines published in the academic calendar should be observed for the filing of graduation applications.

Additional Majors and Degrees (Student Handbook 1.10.E)

A student who is pursuing a program of study leading to completion of all degree requirements, including divisional requirements, in more than one department or area is expected to notify the Office of the University Registrar and the departments involved early in his or her program that he or she is a prospective multiple major and obtain an advisor in each department. A student who completes two or more different majors that result in the awarding of the same baccalaureate degree will receive that degree and will have all majors noted on his or her academic record. A student who completes two or more different majors that would normally result in the awarding of different bachelor’s degrees may receive each degree by applying and paying the fee for each. All requirements for each degree must be met.

A student who has previously received a bachelor’s degree from another accredited college or university may qualify for a bachelor’s degree from Miami by earning an additional 32 credit hours and meeting all specific requirements for the additional degree.

A student receiving a second bachelor’s degree from Miami University may be graduated with distinction if both his or her total average and the average on the work for the second degree qualify under provisions of Chapter 11 (see also Section 1.10.B, if appropriate). All Miami University grades will be used to calculate the average in determining graduation with distinction for the second and subsequent baccalaureate degrees. After terminating enrollment at Miami, a student who has previously received a Miami bachelor’s degree may transfer in no more than eight semester hours toward the requirements of an additional major, or any minor program.

A student who has received an associate degree may qualify for an additional associate degree by meeting all of the specific requirements for the second degree, and applying for and paying the second fee.


Revised 2017




Class Attendance

(Student Handbook 1.9)

General Attendance Policies (Student Handbook 1.9.A)

Every student is expected to participate in academically related activities and attend every class session for which the student is duly registered.

It is the prerogative of the individual faculty member to set attendance policy for each individual course, and it is the responsibility of the individual faculty member to inform students of that policy in the course syllabus or other written document at the first class meeting of the semester, term, or sprint part of semester or term.

There are no University-recognized excused absences except for religious observances that require absence from a class session and other required class activities. Students must give written notification to their instructor within the first week of class of the religious event that prohibits class attendance and the date that will be missed, if officially known. Instructors will, without prejudice, provide such students with reasonable accommodations for completing missed work. However, students are ultimately responsible for material covered in class, regardless of whether the student is absent or present.

Faculty are required to excuse a student’s absence due to pregnancy or related conditions, including recovery from childbirth for as long as the student’s doctor deems the absences to be necessary. When the student returns to classes the student must be provided the opportunity to make up any work missed. Alternatives include allowing the student to take an incomplete and complete the course at a later date, or retaking the course or taking an online course. For additional information go to: www.2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/pregnancy.pdf. The University Senate also recognizes the need for flexibility when childcare responsibilities impact a student and urge instructors to accommodate students with childcare responsibilities.

It is the sense of the University Senate that faculty, student groups and organizations, and the University athletic coaching staff be sensitive to the academic needs of students and the need for students to comply with the attendance policies in their respective courses. In general, class absence should be avoided unless absolutely necessary. If a student is involved in activities that result in class absence (such as intercollegiate athletics, band, debate, other class activities, etc.), it is the student’s responsibility to negotiate specific arrangements with individual instructors about any absences. The Senate also recognizes the fundamental value of extra-and co-curricular activities and their significance in students’ overall educational experience. Instructors should recognize that participation in such activities is an integral part of students’ education and helps to fulfill the comprehensive mission of the University. Therefore, instructors are urged to accommodate student requirements.

Faculty are strongly encouraged to work with students who miss class due to a death in the family, serious illness or other critical circumstance. Students needing assistance regarding absences due to death, illness or other critical circumstance should contact the Office of the Dean of Students (Oxford) or the Student Services (regional campuses).

Whenever a student is absent from class to such an extent as to make the student’s work inefficient or to impair the morale of the class, the instructor may direct the Office of the University Registrar to drop the student. During the first 20 percent of the course no grade will be recorded; after the first 20 percent is completed but before 60 percent of the course is completed, a grade of W will be recorded. After 60 percent of the course is completed, a grade of F will be recorded. The instructor shall notify the student of this action no later than the time he or she notifies the Office of the University Registrar. (See academic calendar.)

A department may, at its discretion, drop from a course any student who is absent from the first class meeting of a semester, term or sprint part of semester or term unless by the end of the day (11:59 p.m.) of the first class meeting the student notifies the department or instructor of his or her intention to take the course. When possible, departments and instructors should reinstate a student who, for reasons beyond his or her control, was unable to contact the department or instructor by this deadline.

The determination of individual class attendance requirements and their enforcement at the Dolibois European Center is governed by the attendance policy of the Center.

The Miami University John E. Dolibois European Center (MUDEC) Attendance Policies (Student Handbook 1.9.B)

Attendance and Grades (Student Handbook 1.9.B.1)

A student at MUDEC whose semester or term grade point average falls below 2.00 will be subject to dismissal from MUDEC at the end of that semester. Note that dismissal from MUDEC is not to be confused with “Academic Dismissal” from the University, as provided by Section 1.3.D of The Student Handbook. It should be taken to mean termination of enrollment at MUDEC.

Students are required to be enrolled fulltime at MUDEC for fall or spring semester for a minimum of 16 credit hours. Full-time enrollment for winter or summer term is governed by specific program rules. Full-year MUDEC students may average 16 credit hours per semester, provided that the larger number of hours is taken in the fall semester (i.e., 17 in Fall, 15 in Spring). Upon a showing of good cause and with the written permission of the Academic Dean of MUDEC, a student may drop below 16 credit hours, but not below 12 hours. A student who drops below 16 credit hours without the permission of the Academic Dean of MUDEC (or below 12 hours if previously given permission by the Academic Dean of MUDEC to drop below 16 hours) will have his or her enrollment at MUDEC terminated immediately. The MUDEC attendance policy parallels that which applies on the Ohio campuses. Classes are small, and professors are expected to take attendance and to have a late arrival policy.

Although travel is an important aspect of the MUDEC experience, students are to be reminded that academic work must be the top priority.

The Student Handbook, Section 1.9.A, states, “Every student is expected to attend every class session for which the student is duly registered.” At MUDEC, this means from Monday morning through Friday, with classes ending around 1:00 p.m. Friday. The winter or summer term may carry alternate expectations, to be determined based upon the class requirements. MUDEC recognizes, however, that from time to time the need may arise for a student to miss a class. However, the number of such absences may not exceed the total number of credit hours of the course in question, and may in no case exceed THREE LECTURE HOURS (180 minutes) per course, even for a five-hour language course. If the number of absences exceeds the permitted limit, the student may be dropped from the class by the instructor (which could result in the student falling below the 16 credit-hour minimum for attendance at MUDEC and thus being in violation of the conditions for enrollment at MUDEC). A student may petition to the Committee of Advisors for an exception to both the semester grade point average rule and the attendance rule, in accordance with the provisions of Section 1.3.E of the Undergraduate Academic Regulations in The Student Handbook, except that the “Committee of Advisors” at MUDEC shall be composed of two fulltime teaching faculty of MUDEC (who make their recommendation to the Academic Dean of MUDEC.

Following termination of enrollment at MUDEC, the student will be required to leave University-provided housing in Luxembourg immediately. Refund of fees paid will be based on the standard MU refund schedule.

Waivers (Student Handbook 1.9.B.2)

Before leaving for Luxembourg, all students are required to sign a waiver indicating: (a) that they have read and understood the MUDEC attendance and discipline policies, and (b) that they understand and accept the possible sanctions in case of any violation of one or the other (or both) of these policies.


Revised 2016; Revised 2015

 




Classification of Students

(Student Handbook 1.8)

Students who have met entrance requirements are admitted to freshman rank. Students with at least 30 but less than 64 earned credit hours are ranked as sophomores. Students with at least 64 but less than 96 earned credit hours are ranked as juniors. Students with 96 or more earned credit hours are ranked as seniors.




Academic Responsibilities and Academic Grievance Policy (Undergraduate)

(Student Handbook 1.7)

Faculty, Staff, and Student Academic Responsibilities (Student Handbook 1.7.A)

 

It is the responsibility of faculty, staff, and students to create an academic community that is free from all forms of prejudice that negatively influence learning, such as those based on age, ethnicity, gender, mental or physical impairment, race, religion, sexual orientation, or gender identity. All faculty, staff, and students should treat one another with courtesy and respect.

Statement of Good Teaching Practices (Student Handbook 1.7.A.1)

Every instructor is responsible for:

  1. Informing his or her students within the first two weeks of the course of the objectives, content, assignments, policy on return of student work, and examination procedure in each course and, within reason, abiding by those statements;
  2. Specifying in writing within the first two weeks of the course the methods by which the instructor determines the final grade in the course;
  3. Ensuring that all materials assigned are equally available to all students in the course;
  4. Informing students of the generally accepted conclusion on the subject matter of the course when those conclusions differ from the conclusions of the instructor;
  5. Giving adequate advance notice of major papers and major examinations in the course;
  6. Providing assignments to permit students to benefit from evaluative experiences during the course;
  7. Being fair and impartial in evaluating all student performances, i.e., evaluating all students according to common criteria;
  8. Allowing students to review papers and examinations in a timely manner after those papers and examinations have been evaluated.
  9. Making himself or herself available for conferences during announced, regular office hours;
  10. Treating students with courtesy and respect at all times. Courtesy and respect do not prohibit strong criticism directed at the student’s academic errors and scholarly responsibilities.
  11. Endeavoring to ensure that the learning environment is free from all forms of prejudice that negatively influence student learning, such as those based on age, ethnicity, gender, mental or physical impairment, race, religion, sexual orientation, or gender identity.
  12. Adhering to the “Class Attendance Policy” (Chapter 9 of Part 1 Undergraduate Academic Regulations in this Student Handbook).
  13. Adhering to the “Statement on Professional Ethics” of the Miami University Policy and Information Manual: As teachers, professors encourage the free pursuit of learning in students. Teachers exemplify the best scholarly standards of their disciplines. They demonstrate respect for students as individuals and adhere to their proper roles as intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster honest academic conduct and to assure that their evaluations of students reflect students’ true merit. Faculty members respect the confidential nature of the relationship between professor and student. They avoid any exploitation of students for their private advantage and acknowledge significant assistance from them. Professors protect their academic freedom. No faculty member shall be obliged to make the academic work of students available for inspection by any third party in the absence of compulsory legal process without bona fide academic reasons or without the express written consent of the student.
  14. Assuming the positive obligation to confront students of suspected academic dishonesty.

Statement of Student Responsibilities (Student Handbook 1.7.A.2)

The Divisional Academic Appeals Boards, in adjudicating any academic grievances, will take note of the following minimum standards of student responsibility.

  1. Attending class in accordance with University regulations (see Class Attendance);
  2. Being attentive during class, and participating constructively in class discussions;
  3. Doing the work assigned in each course to the best of his or her ability, and submitting it on time;
  4. Showing respect for instructors and fellow students at all times;
  5. Abiding by University regulations prohibiting academic misconduct (see Academic Integrity)
  6. Endeavoring to ensure that the learning environment is free from all forms of prejudice that negatively influence student learning, such as those based on age, ethnicity, gender, mental or physical impairment, race, religion, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

Academic Grievance Procedure at Miami University (Student Handbook 1.7.B)

Each academic department has a specific departmental grievance procedure meant to facilitate the adjudication of most student grievances at the departmental level. Divisional academic appeals boards have jurisdiction limited to classroom relations between individual students and instructors as specified in the Statement of Good Teaching Practices.

Academic Grievance Procedure (Student Handbook 1.7.B.1)

A goal of the grievance procedure should be to effect reconciliation between instructor and student.

Any student has the right to question a grade he or she has received, but the student should recognize the difference between questioning a grade and charging an instructor with a violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices. The latter is a serious act and should neither be undertaken lightly nor should the desire to have a grade reviewed and changed be the primary motivation. A student initiating a grievance procedure should be aware that the University Senate has ruled that the final determination of a student’s grade remains with the instructor, regardless of the outcome of any appeal procedure. While most instructors will consent to being advised by their colleagues and may change the student’s grade on advice from a review committee, they cannot be compelled to do so by any authority in the University.

In all cases the student should first meet with the instructor to voice a complaint and to receive an explanation and possible redress. If the student is not satisfied with the explanation, he or she should confer with the chair of the department and ask for a review of the grade through the departmental grievance procedure. Note: students who have complaints about instructors teaching courses on the regional campuses should approach the chair of the regional campus department. The student must at that time ask either for a grade review or may, additionally, charge the instructor with a violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices. If the student asks only for a grade review, the review of the grade will be handled within the department and the final decision will be made according to the departmental procedures.

Formal grievances against instructors for violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices must be presented in terms of the provisions of that Statement. Student charges must cite specific violations of specific provisions of the Statement, identified by number as well as by the wording of the accusation. Students should also note that basic issues of contractual obligation and competence are not covered by the Statement of Good Teaching Practices, and that issues related to instruction not covered by the Statement should be discussed with the department chair, the academic coordinator, the program director, or their designees. A student who is charging a faculty member with a violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices shall first utilize the departmental grievance procedure. If he or she feels that his or her grievance has not been properly adjudicated, he or she should request a conference with the divisional dean. Note: students who have complaints about instructors teaching courses on the regional campuses should approach the dean of the regional campuses. In addition, in an effort to resolve a grievance short of a formal appeal the regional campus students are encouraged to seek a conference with the academic department chair.

If the student wishes to appeal the decision beyond the departmental level, the student may submit to the divisional grievance committee a written, dated, and signed complaint stating the name of the instructor, the course, the provision(s) of the Good Teaching Practices alleged to have been violated, a brief description of the incident(s) giving rise to the grievance, and the remedy requested. The student should also provide any materials supportive of the complaint. Within ten working days after receiving this written complaint from the student, the divisional dean will request the chair of the Divisional Academic Appeals Board to convene a committee to consider and investigate the complaint, and to make its recommendations to the instructor within 30 working days after receiving the complaint. A divisional grievance committee will not adjudicate a violation of Good Teaching Practices unless the written complaint is lodged before 5 p.m. Friday of the eleventh week of the fall or spring semester that follows the term in which the alleged violation occurred.

In the event the instructor is deceased, no longer employed by Miami University, or is otherwise unavailable or incapacitated, the chair or the chair’s designee as approved by the dean may act in place of the instructor.

The Divisional Academic Appeals Board will be constituted as follows: (Student Handbook 1.7.B.2)

At the beginning of each academic year each divisional dean will request every academic department within the division to choose from among its members, with the approval of the department chair, one representative and one alternate to serve as members of the Divisional Academic Appeals Board for that year.

The dean of the division will appoint one of the department representatives as chair of the Divisional Academic Appeals Board for the academic year, and one as a vice-chair.

It will be the responsibility of the chair of each Divisional Academic Appeals Board: (Student Handbook 1.7.B.3)

  1. To appoint, on receipt of a written complaint from a student to the dean, a committee of five (5) members, appropriate to the case in question, consisting of the chair of the Divisional Academic Appeals Board as chair and four (4) representatives from departments related to the discipline in which the complaint originates (including, where appropriate or necessary, representatives from outside the division). No member of the department of the instructor against whom the complaint has been made may be a member of the grievance committee.
  2. To convene the committee to consider the grievance and to preside over the hearing.
  3. To inform the student that the burden of proof rests with the student and that he or she may attend the hearings (excluding executive sessions) and be accompanied by counsel if the student so desires.
  4. To inform the instructor, when the committee decides to consider a case, that a grievance has been received by the committee, and provide the instructor with a full bill of particulars regarding the grievance and its supporting evidence; to request from the instructor in writing information germane to the case; to inform the instructor that he or she may attend the hearings (excluding executive sessions) and be accompanied by counsel if the instructor so desires.
  5. To call for formal recommendations from the committee after consideration of the complaint, with majority vote of the members of the committee required for approval of each recommendation.
  6. To maintain communication with the chairs of all other Divisional Academic Appeals Boards in order to ensure equity and consistency among the divisions in the adjudicating of grievances.
  7. To fulfill the responsibilities listed in Section 1.7.B.4 below.
  8. To keep accurate minutes and records of all hearings, including all written documents submitted as evidence, in a confidential file in the Office of the Secretary of the University, each file subject to review only by the chair of the Academic Appeals Board of the division in which the grievance was heard.
  9. If for any reason the chair is unable to fulfill his or her responsibilities or to serve as chair of a grievance committee, the vice-chair shall fulfill these functions. Appointees shall excuse themselves in the event of potential conflict of interest.

It will be the responsibility of a Divisional Appeals Committee: (Student Handbook 1.7.B.4)

  1. To determine, prior to considering any case, whether frank and full discussions between the student, instructor, department chair, and dean have been exhausted as a means of resolving the grievance. If not, the case shall be referred back to the instructor, chair, or dean as appropriate.
  2. To determine, when hearings are required, the most appropriate procedures to be followed.
  3. To hold hearings to determine the fact (such hearings open to the student and the instructor and their respective counsels with the exception of executive sessions), and to determine, by majority vote of the committee, recommendations as outlined in Section 1.7.B.5 below.

Committee Recommendations (Student Handbook 1.7.B.5)

If the committee finds that no violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices has occurred, or that a violation has occurred but recommends that no redress is warranted, these findings will be reported by the committee chair, in writing, to the student and the instructor with copies sent to the department chair and dean. In addition, a notation of this finding may be made in the student’s permanent record file.

If the committee finds that a violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices has occurred and recommends any form of redress for the student, these recommendations should be reported by the chair of the committee, in writing, to the instructor with a copy sent to the student. The instructor will be expected to inform the committee chair of his or her compliance or noncompliance with the recommendations within ten working days after the letter of notification has been sent to the instructor (failure to respond within ten working days will be taken to indicate noncompliance).

  1. If the instructor complies with the recommendations, the student will be informed in writing, by the committee chair, with copies to the department chair and dean.
  2. If the instructor indicates noncompliance with the recommendations, copies of the recommendations and of the instructor’s reply will be sent to the student and to the department chair and dean. All documents regarding academic grievances and requests for grade review shall be placed in the department’s student complaint file.

Publishing of Statements (Student Handbook 1.7.C)

The Statement of Good Teaching Practices, Professional Ethics, and the Statement of Student Responsibilities will be mailed to faculty at the beginning of each academic year and/or will be published in The Miami Student and The Miami University Report.


Revised 2017; Revised 2016




Financial Obligations (Undergraduate)

(Student Handbook 1.13)

Students are responsible for viewing and paying their eBills. Class registrations are subject to cancellation for any student who fails to clear fees by the published due date. Students are financially responsible for their registration activity. Non-attendance Udoes notU constitute a dropped course (see Registration Procedures). Students who withdraw from the University may be eligible for a refund based upon the refund policy published online at http://miamioh.edu/onestop/your-money/bill-payment/refunds/index.html.

Services, including the release of all academic records of a student or former student (e.g., diploma and transcripts) and registration for future semesters, may be restricted until any past-due amount owed to the University is paid in full. This includes, but is not limited to, fees, tuition, charges, fines, and loans due to the University.

The University’s collection policy is published online at: http://www.units.MiamiOH.edu/bur/.




Student Email Policy

(Student Handbook 1.14/Graduate Handbook 2.8)

A Miami University-provided email address (UniqueID@MiamiOH.edu) is an official means of communication. Students are responsible for all University communication sent to their Miami email address. It is expected that students check their email account on a frequent and consistent basis. To ensure that students remain current with University-related communications, students are strongly encouraged to check their email at least two times a week. Students are advised to respond to all official University communications as directed in each communication (e.g., responding in person, by surface mail, or by email). Students should not assume an email response is a satisfactory substitution when directed otherwise. Furthermore, students should follow Miami University’s policy on Responsible Use of Computing Resources, found in Section 19 of the Miami University Policy and Information Manual(MUPIM).

Students are subject to this email policy beginning at summer orientation, during academic terms for which they are enrolled, during breaks between terms, during University holidays and vacations, and during periods of suspension.

Students may forward their Miami email to another email address (e.g., @Hotmail). However, Miami University is not liable for any problems that may result from forwarding Miami email to another account (e.g., problems with spam filters, full mailboxes, or loss of attachments). Students should understand that forwarding their University email may have the unintended consequence of exposing their privacy information to third parties because Internet email is handled in a public fashion.

Faculty members determine how they will use email in their classes. Faculty may wish to include their email expectations in the course syllabus. The distribution of mass communications is restricted to University departments and offices for University business. External requests for mass communications will not be honored.

As stated in Section 19 of the Miami University Policy and Information Manual, “The University employs various measures to protect the security of its computing resources and users’ accounts. However, users should be aware that the University does not and cannot guarantee such security.” Furthermore, individuals are advised to exercise caution when sending sensitive or FERPA-protected student information via email. In addition, individuals are reminded that some University information is not appropriate for email communication.




Academic Integrity

(Student Handbook 1.5)

Introduction (Student Handbook 1.5.A)

Miami University is a scholarly community whose members believe that excellence in education is grounded in qualities of character as well as of intellect. We respect the dignity of other persons, the rights and property of others, and the right of others to hold and express disparate beliefs. We believe in honesty, integrity, and the importance of moral conduct. We defend the freedom of inquiry that is the heart of learning and combine that freedom with the exercise and the acceptance of personal responsibility.

Miami demands the highest standards of conduct from its students, faculty, and staff. As a community of scholars, our fundamental purpose is the pursuit of knowledge. Integrity in academic study is based on sound disciplinary practices and expectations as well as a commitment to the values of honesty and integrity.

As stated in the Statement of Good Teaching Practices (MUPIM, Section 5.4), a responsibility of the faculty is to “…demonstrate respect for students as individuals, and adhere to their proper roles as intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster honest academic conduct and to assure that their evaluations of students reflect students’ true merit.” Faculty also have the responsibility for “assuming the positive obligation to confront students suspected of academic dishonesty.”

All Miami students are expected to be of the highest character and to behave honestly in their learning and in their behavior outside the classroom. Academic and other forms of dishonesty violate the spirit of the values espoused by Miami University and undermine the value of a Miami education for everyone, especially for the person who is dishonest. Therefore, students are encouraged to hold one another accountable and report suspected academic dishonesty to their instructors. Additionally, when students err in their academic conduct, they are expected to accept responsibility for and learn from their actions. As such, the process outlined in this policy is intended to be educational in nature and provide learning opportunities for students in maintaining personal and academic integrity.

Students are responsible for knowing and understanding these standards; misunderstanding of the appropriate academic conduct will not be accepted as an excuse for academic dishonesty. If a student is in doubt about appropriate academic conduct in a particular situation, he or she should consult with the instructor of the course, the department chair/program director, the academic dean in the appropriate division, or the Coordinator for Academic Integrity in order to maintain the highest standards of academic integrity.

Criteria (Student Handbook 1.5.B)

Academic dishonesty is defined as any activity that compromises the academic integrity of the institution or subverts the educational process. Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to:

Academic Dishonesty (Student Handbook 1.5.B.1)

Academic dishonesty is defined as engaging or attempting to engage in any activity that compromises the academic integrity of the institution or subverts the educational process, including as a means to complete or assist in the completion of an academic assignment.

An academic assignment is defined as the submission or presentation of any student work for evaluation, grade, or academic credit. This includes, but is not limited to, assignments in courses, proficiency waiver exams, and portfolios of research submitted to earn academic credit. This definition applies to work submitted face-to-face or through on-line or electronic means and work submitted for face-to-face, hybrid, and on-line courses affiliated with any of Miami University’s campuses and divisions.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following acts.

Acts of academic dishonesty (Student Handbook 1.5.B.2)

    1. Cheating: using or attempting to use or possessing any aid, information, resources, or means in the completion of an academic assignment that are not explicitly permitted by the instructor or providing such assistance to another student.

Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to:

      • Possessing, referring to, or using in any way unauthorized textbooks, notes, study aids, crib/cheat sheets, or other information during an academic assignment, in paper, electronic, or other format;
      • Possessing, referring to, or using in any way unauthorized electronic devices or other materials during an academic assignment;
      • Looking at or using information from another student’s work during an academic assignment;
      • Receiving assistance from another individual in any academic assignment when not explicitly permitted by the instructor;
      • Utilizing or soliciting another person to complete any portion of an academic assignment in place of oneself or submitting the work of another person as one’s own;
      • Submitting the identical or substantially the same assignment to fulfill the requirements for two or more courses without approval of the instructors involved or submitting the identical or substantially the same assignment from a previously completed course to fulfill the requirements for another course without the approval of the instructor of the latter course;
      • Completing or participating in the completion of any portion of an academic assignment for another student to submit as his or her own work, including taking a quiz or an examination for another student;
      • Providing assistance, information, or materials to another student in a manner not authorized by the instructor.
    1. Plagiarism: presenting as one’s own the work, the ideas, the representations, or the words of another person/source without proper attribution.

Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to:

      • Submitting material that in part or whole is not entirely one’s own work without accurate and appropriate citations and attribution (including appropriate use of quotation marks);
      • Using the words, ideas, or structure/sequence of another person or source without accurate and appropriate citation and attribution (including the appropriate use of quotation marks).
    1.  Fabrication: falsification, invention, or manipulation of any information, citation, data, or method.

Examples of fabrication include, but are not limited to:

      • Changing material on a graded academic assignment and requesting re-grading for that assignment;
      • Presenting false or invented information in any academic assignment;
      • Presenting false claims regarding how information or data was collected or generated;
      • Providing an inaccurate account of how information or data was collected or generated;
      • Inventing or inaccurately presenting citations or sources.
    1.  Unauthorized collaboration: working with another individual or individuals in any phase of or in the completion of an individual academic assignment without explicit permission from the instructor to complete the work in such a manner.
    2.  Misrepresentation: falsely representing oneself or one’s efforts or abilities in an academic assignment.

Examples of misrepresentation include, but are not limited to:

      • Utilizing another person to complete any portion of an academic assignment in place of one’s self;
      • Having another individual sign-in for a course or use an iClicker or other electronic device to record one’s presence or participation in a class.
    1.  Gaining an unfair advantage: completing an academic assignment through use of information or means not available to other students or engaging in any activity that interferes with another student’s ability to complete his or her academic work

Examples of gaining an unfair advantage include, but are not limited to:

    •  Retaining, possessing, using, or distributing previous or current academic assignment materials when the instructor has indicated that those materials are not to be retained or shared or are to be returned to the instructor at the conclusion of the academic assignment or course (including originals, copies, reproductions, or pictures and electronic or hard copy formats);
    • Taking pictures of, making copies of, or reproducing any academic assignment materials when the instructor has indicated that those materials are not to be copied or reproduced in any form;
    • Obstructing or interfering with another student’s academic work or ability to gain access to information to be used in the completion of an academic assignment;
    • Taking another student’s work without his or her knowledge;
    • Removing academic assignment materials from an instructor’s office, classroom, computer, or any other University space (physical or virtual/electronic);
    • Violating the procedures described to maintain the integrity of an academic assignment.

Attempts to engage in any of the above actions will be treated the same as completed acts.

Procedures for Reporting and Adjudicating Cases of Academic Dishonesty (Student Handbook 1.5.C)

Academic dishonesty weakens the quality of education and the academic culture for all members of the Miami University community. All members of the Miami University community are expected to uphold the principles of academic integrity and to deter and report academic dishonesty.

Procedures for reporting alleged academic dishonesty (Student Handbook 1.5.C.1)

If academic dishonesty is suspected to have occurred within a course, the course instructor who suspects that a student has engaged in academic dishonesty shall refer the alleged incident to the department chair/program director at the campus where the course is offered in a timely manner (i.e., regional campuses chairs handle cases related to course sections offered on the regional campuses). If academic dishonesty is suspected to have occurred on an academic assignment that is not within a course (e.g., proficiency waiver examination, portfolio or research submitted for credit), the person in charge of the academic assignment shall refer the alleged incident to his or her department chair/program director.

Note: department chair/program director refers to the department chair of an academic department or the director of a program not housed within an academic department. 

Other persons, including students, who believe they have knowledge of academic dishonesty, should report the alleged dishonesty to the instructor of the course or person in charge of the academic assignment in which the dishonesty is alleged to have occurred. If, after reasonable inquiry, the course instructor or person in charge of the academic assignment finds the report credible, he or she will report the alleged incident to the appropriate department chair/program director.

In referring the alleged incident to the department chair/program director, the course instructor or person in charge of the academic assignment (herein referred to as the instructor) shall provide an account of the incident and include all relevant documentation. The instructor is encouraged to communicate to the student suspected of committing academic dishonesty that he or she has been referred to the department chair/program director.

Once a referral has been submitted to the department chair/program director, the department chair/program director may meet with the instructor to discuss the criteria for academic dishonesty, hearing procedures, the nature of the evidence, or to request more information.

Procedures for notifying referred student(s) (Student Handbook 1.5.C.2)

The department chair/program director shall notify the student referred for a suspected case of academic dishonesty in writing via the student’s University electronic mail address that a referral has been made and will schedule a hearing with the referred student. The department chair/program director will notify the student via the student’s University electronic mail address of the hearing no fewer than five class days prior to the hearing. If the student requests that the hearing occur prior to the scheduled date, the department chair/program director shall make every effort to accommodate a student’s request for an expedited hearing date, taking into consideration the availability of all involved in the hearing. (Note: any reference to class days in this policy does not include final exam week.)

  1. The referral notification must include a copy of the instructor’s report with all supporting documentation; the date, time and location of the hearing (or request for the student to contact the department chair/program director to schedule the hearing by a specified date); the Student Guide to Academic Dishonesty; and it will refer the student to the procedures outlined in this section.
  2. In the notification, the student also will be informed that if he or she has been found responsible for a prior violation of academic dishonesty or for a violation of Section 102 (Dishonesty) of the Code of Student Conduct, that suspension from the University for a semester is the minimum sanction that will be imposed if the student is found responsible for the alleged incident.
  3. The student also will be informed that he or she may request to meet with the Coordinator for Academic Integrity or the department chair/program director or designee to review these procedures and the charges against him or her.
  4. If the suspected case of dishonesty involves a student serving as a substitute for or assisting someone else in completing an academic assignment, both the student responsible for the academic assignment and the student alleged to have provided prohibited academic assistance will be referred, and the case may, at the discretion of the department chair/program director, be addressed in a single hearing during which both students are present.

Procedures for conducting the hearing (Student Handbook 1.5.C.3)

Department chairs/program directors may conduct the hearing for the referred case of suspected academic dishonesty or they may identify a designee to conduct the hearing. The designee must be a Miami University faculty member or administrator but need not be from the department/program in which the referral originates. If a student requests that a designee conduct the hearing, the department chair/program director must identify a designee to conduct the hearing.

When possible, hearings should be held with all parties present, in person. However, if all parties are not able to be present in person, hearings may be held via video/phone means in order to facilitate a timely resolution of the case (e.g., during breaks between terms, for overseas students).

  1. The instructor who referred the case of suspected academic dishonesty will be present at the hearing. In an extraordinary circumstance, if the instructor cannot be present, either in person or via video/phone, the hearing may occur with the report the instructor submitted used in place of the instructor’s testimony.
  2. Referred students may have an advisor or parent present with them at the hearing. However, the advisor or parent may not speak on the student’s behalf or present any arguments. The role of a student’s advisor or parent is to support and advise the student.

At the hearing the instructor shall present the referred student and department chair/program director or designee with the evidence of academic dishonesty, including any supporting witnesses or information. The referred student will have the opportunity to respond, submit a written statement, invite factual witnesses to attend on his or her behalf, and ask questions of the instructor and witnesses called by the instructor. The department chair/program director or designee conducting the hearing shall ask questions of all parties involved in order to understand the full nature of the situation and the evidence presented by both parties.

To the extent possible or necessary, the hearing should serve as an opportunity to have an educational conversation with the referred student about academic integrity.

Procedures for adjudicating cases of academic dishonesty (Student Handbook 1.5.C.4)

Following the hearing, the department chair/program director or designee shall review all of the documentation and testimony and determine whether the referred student has committed an act of academic dishonesty. The greater weight of the evidence is sufficient for the department chair/program director or designee to conclude the student committed academic dishonesty.

If the department chair/program director or designee concludes that the student is not responsible for committing academic dishonesty, the department chair/program director or designee will inform in writing via the student’s University electronic mail address, the student, the referring instructor, and the dean or his or her designee of the division in which the violation was alleged to have occurred, and the Coordinator for Academic Integrity of this finding. If the department chair/program director or designee determines that no violation of the Academic Integrity Policy has occurred, but that the student may benefit therefrom, the department chair/program director or designee may direct the student to successfully complete an educational seminar conducted by the Coordinator for Academic Integrity within a specified period of time.

If the department chair/program director or designee concludes that the student is responsible for committing academic dishonesty, the department chair/program director or designee, after conferring with the referring instructor, will determine a recommended sanction to be made to the dean or his or her designee of the academic unit in which the violation occurred.

    1. Prior to sending the finding notice, the department chair/program director or designee will first determine if the student has been found responsible for any previous acts of dishonesty. The department chair/program director or designee will contact the Coordinator for Academic Integrity to determine if the student has been found responsible for any previous acts of academic dishonesty or violations of the Code of Student Conduct—Dishonesty.
    2. If the department chair/program director or designee determines that the violation of academic dishonesty is the first instance of dishonesty for which the student has been found responsible, the department chair/program director or designee will recommend to the dean or designee one of the following grade-related sanctions:
      • A letter grade of F, the numerical grade of zero, a percentage grade of zero (0) percent, or a reduced grade or receipt of zero credit for any academic assignment on which academic dishonesty was found to have occurred, or any other portion of the course;
      • A reduced grade for the entire course, including the possible specification of a course letter grade of F or Y (no credit) for a course taken credit/no credit;
      • A letter grade of F for the entire course with transcript notation of “Academic Dishonesty (class)” and the recording of a grade of either ADF for F or ADY for credit/no credit.

The following sanctions also may be applied:

    • Participation in an academic integrity workshop conducted by Miami University. The student will be required to pay for the workshop. Failure to complete the workshop will result in a hold being placed on a student’s ability to register for subsequent semesters or to change a class schedule.
    • Completion of an educational seminar other than the academic integrity workshop, listed above.
    • In extraordinary circumstances, the recommendation for suspension may be recommended for a first offense.
  1. If the department chair/program director or designee determines that the student previously has been found responsible for an act of academic dishonesty or for violating the Code of Student Conduct—Dishonesty, the automatic sanction will be suspension for at least one semester. If the student is found responsible for an act of academic dishonesty and previously has been suspended for dishonesty, the automatic sanction will be dismissal from the University.
  2. If the case involves two students, one of whom substituted for another in completing an academic assignment, the automatic sanction will be suspension of both students—the student responsible for the academic assignment and the student providing prohibited assistance.
  3. The department chair/program director or designee will provide a report to the dean or designee and will notify the student in writing of his or her decision.
    • The notice to the dean or his or her designee will include the name of the student, the student’s identification number, full details of the case, and the recommended sanction.
    • The notice to the student will be sent to the accused student via the student’s University electronic mail address. The notice will include a statement of the student’s right to appeal the decision of the department chair/program director or designee as outlined in Section 1.5.D and include the instructions for submitting an appeal.

Appeals of the Department Chair/Program Director or Designee’s Finding and Recommended Sanctions (Student Handbook 1.5.D)

A student found responsible for an act of academic dishonesty by a department chair/program director or designee may appeal the decision in writing to the dean or designee of the division in which the alleged violation occurred within five class days following the student’s receipt of the notice of the findings of the hearing from the department chair/program director or designee*. Note: cases which originated on and were heard by the chair, program director on the regional campuses will be handled by the dean of the regional campuses. The appeal document submitted by the student should state the basis for the appeal and include all supporting documents. (Note: any reference to class days in this policy does not include final exam week.)

*Students who are studying abroad at the time of the notice may be given extended time to submit an appeal based on ability to communicate via electronic means.

  1. Appeals may be made on three grounds: (1) inappropriate sanction, (2) procedural defects in the adjudication of the case sufficiently substantial to have affected the outcome of the hearing, or (3) new evidence sufficiently substantial to have affected the outcome of the hearing.
  2. If the dean or designee concludes that procedural defects occurred or new evidence is available, either or both of which is sufficiently substantial to have affected the outcome of the case, the dean or designee will order a new hearing. The department chair/program director or designee shall identify a designee to hear the case anew.
  3. If the dean or designee concludes the recommended sanction was inappropriate, the dean or designee will impose the appropriate sanction.

Sanctions (Student Handbook 1.5.E)

After acting upon any appeals and giving due consideration to the sanction recommendation of the department chair/program director or designee, the dean or designee will impose the final sanction. Should the dean or designee disagree with the recommendation of the department chair/program director or designee, he or she will consult with the department chair/program director or designee and faculty member prior to changing the recommended sanction.

If the dean or designee concludes that failure for the course with transcript notation of “Academic Dishonesty (class)” and the recording of a grade of either ADF for F or ADY for credit/no credit is the appropriate sanction, the Office of the University Registrar will record the grade of ADF or ADY for the course with a transcript notation of “Academic Dishonesty (class).” If the student officially drops the course, and the recommended sanction was failure for the course, a grade of ADF or ADY shall be imposed with a transcript notation of “Academic Dishonesty.” A student may not change his or her grading option after the date of the academic dishonesty occurrence.

If the dean or designee concludes that suspension is the appropriate sanction, the Office of the University Registrar will place the notice “Suspension for Dishonesty” on the student’s academic record. Similarly, dismissal for academic dishonesty shall be noted on the student’s academic record as “Dismissal for Dishonesty.”

  1. In imposing the sanction of suspension, the dean or designee may suspend the student either immediately or at the close of the current academic semester or term. A sanction of dismissal will take effect immediately.
  2. Suspensions will not be for less than the remainder of the current academic semester or term nor more than the remainder of the current academic semester or term plus up to two succeeding terms or semesters. Suspended students may not attend any term or semester at Miami during a period of suspension.
  3. Academic credit earned elsewhere during a period of suspension will not be accepted in transfer. Incomplete grades may not be removed during periods of suspension or dismissal.

The dean or designee will notify the student of the final sanction decision via the student’s University electronic mail address. The dean or designee will send copies of the final decision letter to the referring instructor, the department chair/program director or designee who conducted the hearing, the Office of the University Registrar, and the Coordinator for Academic Integrity. No sanctions will be imposed until the final decision letter by the dean or designee is sent.

Records of Academic Dishonesty (Student Handbook 1.5.F)

The Coordinator for Academic Integrity, on behalf of the Office of the Provost, is responsible for maintaining records of any adjudication of academic dishonesty. Records of these hearings are kept confidential to the extent permitted by law.

  1. Records of hearings regarding academic dishonesty resulting in a finding of not responsible will be maintained in the Office of the Provost until the end of the academic year in which the finding is made at which time they are destroyed.
  2. Records of disciplinary actions resulting in a finding of responsible and sanctions other than suspensions or dismissals are maintained by the Office of the Provost for seven academic years following the date the finding is made at which time they are destroyed.
  3. Records of disciplinary actions resulting in a finding of responsible and a sanction of suspensions or dismissals are maintained indefinitely by the Office of the Provost. A notation of suspension or dismissal is reflected on the student’s official University academic record (transcript) maintained by the Office of the University Registrar.
  4. At any time after seven years from the date of the finding in which a sanction less than dismissal was imposed, a student or former student may petition the Provost or designee to have the person’s records of academic dishonesty expunged. In consultation with the Dean of Students, the decision to expunge will be based on the severity of the violation(s), the person’s disciplinary record as a whole (including incidents adjudicated by the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution), and evidence of good behavior since the violation(s). If the record is expunged, any notation of academic dishonesty or suspension for academic dishonesty will be removed from the official academic record maintained by the Office of the University Registrar.
  5. A student who has been dismissed from the University may not request to have his or her record expunged. However, the Provost has the authority to expunge the record and remove the notation in extraordinary circumstances any time after seven academic years from the date the finding was made.

Graduation (Student Handbook 1.5.G)

All Miami University academic dishonesty charges against a student must be resolved and sanctions completed before a student is eligible to graduate.

Interpretation of the Academic Integrity Policy (Student Handbook 1.5.H)

Any question of interpretation or application of the Academic Integrity Policy shall be referred to the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs or designee for final determination.


Revised 2017




Grades and Scholarship (Undergraduate)

(Student Handbook 1.3)

Grades (Student Handbook 1.3.A)

Grades for all students are reported to the Office of the University Registrar. Grade submission deadlines and dates by which grades are viewable are listed on the academic calendar (http://www.units.MiamiOH.edu/reg/calendars/).

Standard Letter Grade Grades Points Per Semester Hour
A+ 4.00
A (Excellent) 4.00
A- 3.70
B+ 3.30
B (Good) 3.00
B- 2.70
C+ 2.30
C (Satisfactory) 2.00
C- 1.70
D+ 1.30
D (Poor) 1.00
D- 0.70
F (Failure) 0.00

If a student is found responsible of academic dishonesty, and the resulting sanction is failure for the course, a notation of academic dishonesty will appear directly beneath the class on the academic record. (Refer to section on Academic Integrity)

Other grade symbols include:

I       =      Incomplete; calculates as an F in grade point averages.

IG    =      Incomplete work at the graduate level; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

IGY =      Incomplete work at the graduate level in a credit/no credit course; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

IU    =      Incomplete work at the undergraduate level; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

IUY =      Incomplete work at the undergraduate level in a credit/no credit course; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

L      =      Audit; not included in enrollment status hours; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

N     =      No grade submitted by the instructor; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

P      =      Passing; carries no credit points; not included in the calculation of grade point averages (used for student teaching, thesis hours, dissertation hours).

S      =      Satisfactory progress; carries no credit points; not included in the calculation of grade point averages (used for courses in research, independent work, special problems, thesis hours, dissertation hours, and undergraduate honors courses); changes to a final grade by the instructor when the work is completed.

U     =      Unsatisfactory progress; carries no credit points; not included in the calculation of grade point averages (used for special projects as described above under grade of S); changes to a final grade by the instructor when the work is completed.

W    =      Withdrawal; The last date to drop a course without a “W” is posted on the Academic Calendar which is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar. Credit is not awarded for a withdrawal and the course is not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

X     =      Credit in a course taken credit/no-credit in which a grade of D- or better is earned in an undergraduate course, or in which a grade of B or better is earned in a graduate course; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

Y     =      No credit in a course taken credit/no-credit in which a grade of F is earned in an undergraduate course, or in which a grade of B- or less is earned in a graduate course; not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

Z      =      Course grades preceded by Z indicate the Fresh Start policy has been applied.

Midterm Grades (Student Handbook 1.3.B)

In the fall and spring semesters, instructors are required to submit midterm grades by the end of the eighth week of classes for all undergraduate students who have 45 or fewer earned credits at Miami University. This requirement applies only to full-semester and twelve-week Q-sprint classes during the fall and spring semesters; it does not apply to other fall and spring semester sprint classes or for the winter and summer terms.  Midterm grades are accessible online through Bannerweb. Instructors are encouraged to submit midterm grades for all other students.

Change of Grade and Removal of Grade of Incomplete (Student Handbook 1.3.C)

Change of Grade (Student Handbook 1.3.C.1)

A final grade once reported may be changed only upon recommendation of the instructor with the approval of the dean of the academic division. It is the right of any student to consult with the instructor concerning the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s performance in a particular course. If such consultation does not satisfy the student, it is the student’s right to confer with the department chair of the instructor concerned. Further appeal procedures are described in Chapter 7.

Removal of Grade of Incomplete (Student Handbook 1.3.C.2)

Until removed, a grade of Incomplete will remain as an “I” and be calculated as an F. Grades of IG, IGY, IU, and IUY will not be calculated in grade point averages. A change of a grade of Incomplete requires only the instructor’s signature. A grade of Incomplete not removed by either of the options below will be changed to an F on the last day of classes of the following semester, excluding summer or winter term for undergraduate students and winter term for graduate students. If more than one instance of the same course has a grade of Incomplete, a change of grade only applies to one instance.

Options for removal of I, IG, IGY, IU, and IUY are as follows:

Completing the course requirements. This must be done by the last day of classes of the next semester, excluding summer or winter term for undergraduate students and winter term for graduate students. A grade of Incomplete may be removed during periods of non-enrollment including academic suspension and dismissal (see Restrictions for Students under Academic Suspension or Dismissal). A grade of Incomplete  may not be removed during periods of non-academic suspension or non-academic dismissal.

Repeating the course. If, in the instructor’s judgment, repeating the course is the most suitable  action for completing the requirements of the course, the student may repeat the course. The course must be taken for letter grade. Once the course has been completed, the grade of Incomplete will remain on the record but taken out of the calculation of grade point averages. This arrangement must be reported to the Office of the University Registrar in writing prior to enrolling in the course for the second time. If not reported, the student must petition the Interdivisional Committee of Advisors.

Graduating students. Grades of Incomplete for a graduating student must be satisfactorily resolved by the conclusion of end-of-semester/term processing for the student’s date of graduation, approximately 30 days after the date of graduation. If not satisfactorily resolved, the grade of Incomplete will be administratively converted to the grade of F.

Academic Action and Incomplete Grades. When there has been no instructor grade change by the last class day of the semester or term, excluding summer or winter term for undergraduate students and winter term for graduate students, following the assignment of the grade of Incomplete, the grade of Incomplete is administratively changed to the grade of F and calculates in the semester or term and cumulative grade point averages. Grade point average calculations occur at the conclusion of each semester or term and are recalculated for the semester or term in which the grade of Incomplete was awarded. Academic actions (warning, probation, suspension, and dismissal) for the semester or term in which the grade of Incomplete was awarded will not be assessed.

Computation of Averages and Definition of Earned Hours, Attempted Hours, and Grade Point Average Hours, President’s and Dean’s Lists (Student Handbook 1.3.D)

Earned Hours. Earned hours are credit hours for courses passed at Miami University and credit hours accepted in transfer from other institutions or sources.

Attempted Hours. Attempted hours are credit hours attempted in any course taken at Miami University.

Grade Point Average Hours. Grade point average hours are hours in courses taken at Miami University receiving standard letter grades including grades of the incomplete grade of “I”. Grade point average hours do not include transfer hours, AP/CLEP hours, pass/fail, credit/no credit, audit, proficiency credit, English portfolio, or standard letter-grade course hours dropped with a W. Grade point average hours are the only hours included in the computation of semester and cumulative averages and in determining academic actions.

Semester or Term Average. A student’s average for any semester or term is computed by dividing the student’s total credit points for that semester by the number of grade point average hours attempted.

Cumulative Average. A student’s cumulative average is computed by dividing the total Miami grade points by the total number of grade point average hours at Miami, treating Incompletes as stated above.

Truncating Grade Point Averages. Grade point averages are truncated to the second decimal point (e.g., 2.856 to 2.85).

President’s and Dean’s Lists.  The President’s List recognizes the top three percent of undergraduate students within each division registered for 12 or more credit hours attempted for grades (A+ through F) in a semester or term (excluding winter term). The Dean’s Lists recognize the next 17 percent of undergraduate students within each division registered for 12 or more hours attempted for grades (A+ through F) in a semester or term (excluding winter term).

Students within each academic division must achieve the following grade point averages:

Division President’s List Dean’s List
Arts and Science 4.00 3.70
Creative Arts 4.00 3.70
Education, Health and Society 4.00 3.80
Engineering and Computing 4.00 3.60
Farmer School of Business 3.95 3.60
Professional Studies and Applied Sciences 4.00 3.60

The grade point standards used for the President’s and the Dean’s Lists approximate the average grade point average of the highest three percent of students in each academic division and the next 17 percent of students in each academic division, respectively, for the past three years. These criteria will remain unchanged.

Note: Undergraduate students in non-degree programs who meet these same criteria will be included in the College of Arts and Science divisional calculations.

Miami University’s News and Communications Office notifies the hometown newspaper of each student eligible for the President’s or Dean’s Lists. Note that a confidentiality hold on a student’s record will prevent his or her name from being published in the hometown newspaper or on the Miami University website. Dean’s and President’s lists are considered finalized approximately 30 days after the end of the semester and are not subsequently recalculated.

Scholastic Regulations (Student Handbook 1.3.E)

Academic Actions. Academic actions are defined as academic warning; removal of academic warning; academic probation; removal of academic probation; academic suspension; and academic dismissal. Academic actions occur on the basis of semester or term and/or cumulative grade point averages as computed by the Office of the University Registrar at the end of a semester or term. Academic actions will be taken on any student regardless of the number of hours taken in any semester or term with suspension and dismissal exclusions as noted below. Good academic standing is defined as maintaining a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average. Students on academic warning are also considered to be in good academic standing.

Student Classification for Academic Action Purposes. All Miami grade point average hours recorded on the academic record are considered in the classification of a student for academic action.

Academic Warning. An undergraduate student who earns a grade point average less than 2.00 during his/her first semester or term will be placed on academic warning at the end of the semester or term. Excluding a student’s first semester or term, in all subsequent semesters/terms an undergraduate student with fewer than 16 cumulative grade point average hours who earns a cumulative grade point average less than 2.00 is placed or continued on academic warning.

Removal of Academic Warning. If an undergraduate student has a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better, the student is removed from academic warning at the end of the semester or term.

Academic Probation. An undergraduate student with 16 or more cumulative Miami grade point average hours is placed on academic probation at the end of any semester or term in which his/her cumulative grade point average is less than 2.00.

Removal of Academic Probation. If an undergraduate student has a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better, the student shall be removed from academic probation at the end of the semester or term.

Continuation on Academic Probation. An undergraduate student with 16-29 Miami grade point average hours who is on academic probation and who has a cumulative grade point average of less than 2.00 is continued on academic probation. An undergraduate student with 30 or more Miami grade point average hours who is on academic probation and who has a grade point average for a semester or term of 2.00 or better, but has a cumulative grade point average of less than 2.00, is continued on academic probation.

Academic Suspension. An undergraduate student with 30 or more Miami grade point average hours who is on academic probation will be suspended if his/her grade point average for a semester or term is less than 2.00. The period of suspension is two consecutive semesters or terms. Winter term is excluded as a term on which suspension can be applied or satisfied. (See Re-enrollment after Academic Suspension or Dismissal).

Academic Dismissal. Failure to meet academic standards after academic suspension results in academic dismissal. The period of academic dismissal  is usually considered a permanent action, but a student may petition for readmission after a two-year absence. Winter term is excluded as a term on which dismissal can be applied or satisfied. (see Re-enrollment after Academic Suspension or Dismissal).

Exceptions to Scholastic Regulations (Student Handbook 1.3.F)

Undergraduate Students (Student Handbook 1.3.F.1)

  1. Interdivisional Committee of Advisors. The Office of the Provost provides University-wide supervision of the system of academic advising in collaboration with the Undergraduate Academic Advising Council. The Interdivisional Committee of Advisors takes action on matters requiring exceptions to the academic regulations of the University at the undergraduate student level. Neither the Interdivisional Committee of Advisors nor Graduate Council can provide exceptions to state or federal law. (See 1.9.B.1 for students attending the John E. Dolibois European Center [MUDEC]).MembershipPermanent Membership. One (1) appointed as the Chair by the Provost, votes only in the event of a tie vote by members attending; five (5) representatives, one from each of the five undergraduate academic divisions, appointed by the deans of the divisions; two (2) representatives, one from each of the regional campuses, appointed by the Dean of the Regional Campuses; and one (1) representative from the Council of First-Year Advisors, appointed by the Dean of Students.Rotating Membership (each to serve three-year rotating terms). Faculty representing three divisions, appointed by the dean of the division: One (1) from College of Arts and Science, with three-year terms by social science, natural science and humanities; one (1) from Farmer School of Business or College of Engineering and Computing; one (1) from College of Education, Health, and Society or College of Creative Arts.Divisions will rotate their terms (e.g., a representative from the Farmer School of Business will serve a three-year term followed by a representative from the College of Engineering and Computing, then back to Farmer School of Business, etc.). Terms will begin effective the first day of the fall semester.
  2. Procedures for Petitioning. An undergraduate student may petition for an exception to any of the University’s academic regulations. Students initiate petitions by contacting their representative at their respective campus. The division, classification, or campus of the student determine which committee shall hear the initial petition, as follows: Oxford first-year student matters are considered by the Council of First-Year Advisors; Oxford upper-class student matters are considered by the committee of advisors in the academic division of the student’s primary major. All regional campusstudent matters are considered by the committee of advisors at the regional campuses. Consult the Graduate Student Handbook for petitioning procedures for graduate students.Petition recommendations are then forwarded by the regional campuses, Council of First-Year Advisors, and the divisional committees of advisors and are reviewed by the Interdivisional Committee of Advisors, which has the authority to refuse to consider, to table, to reverse, or to affirm the recommendation.

Graduate Students (Student Handbook 1.3.F.2)

Graduate students’ matters are addressed by the Graduate Council. Consult the Graduate Student Handbook for petitioning procedures. Neither the Interdivisional Committee of Advisors nor Graduate Council can provide exceptions to state or federal law.

Restrictions for Students under Academic Suspension or Dismissal (Student Handbook 1.3.G)

A student under academic suspension or dismissal from Miami University may neither register for credit nor audit courses during the period of his or her suspension or dismissal on any campus of Miami University. Credit earned elsewhere (e.g., transfer credit, Advanced Placement, CLEP) during the term of academic suspension or academic dismissal will be accepted. In addition, refer to Section 1.1.E regarding re-enrollment.

Re-enrollment after Academic Suspension or Dismissal (Student Handbook 1.3.H)

Academic Suspension (Student Handbook 1.3.H.1)

A student placed on academic suspension for low scholarship is eligible for re-enrollment on academic probation after at least two consecutive semesters or terms (including summer) have elapsed. Winter term does not count in the computation of a consecutive term. Students requesting housing must first check with the appropriate office; and, if academic facilities are available, re-enrollment will normally be approved providing application for re-enrollment is submitted at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester or term in which the student intends to enroll.

Dismissal (Student Handbook 1.3.H.2)

A student dismissed for low scholarship may petition for re-enrollment after two calendar years have elapsed, beginning with the start of the next semester or term. The petition should be presented to the Committee of Advisors in the student’s academic division for a recommendation; it will be forwarded to the Interdivisional Committee of Advisors for action.


Revised 2017