Conflict & Resolution: SRE Awards Ceremony

By Caroline Ward, Marketing & Communications Intern

 

 

 

 

On Thursday, April 13, the Miami University Art Museum held a reception and awards ceremony for the student artists in the “Conflict & Resolution” exhibition. It was open to the public, students, faculty, family, and friends.

Jason Shaiman addressing visitors at the awards ceremony on April 13 at the Miami University Art Museum.

In this fourth annual juried Student Response Exhibition, Miami students present diverse commentaries on the topic of military conflict and resolution. Not restricted to World War I, students reflect on perceptions of what it means to be at war and the resulting search for peace. The Student Response Exhibition has been on display since January 24 and will end on May 13. The show exhibits work by Amanda Adams, Patti Ann Cossel, Hannah Edmonds, Joshua Gabbard, Emma Leising, Alisha Mason, Mackenzie Mettey, Rebekah Mohn, GM Akand Sabik, Billy Simms, Claudia Tommasi, and Caroline Ward.

The reception and awards ceremony held on April 13 invited friends, family and the public to celebrate the artists in the exhibition. The announcement of the top three favorite pieces voted by visitors of the art museum happened after the reception.

First place winner was Amanda Adams for her monotype print Cat Scan Soldier (2016). Emma Leising won second place for her woodblock print The Demolition of Adam (2016). The third place winner was Caroline Ward for her oil painting Paul (2016). See artists with their work below.

Award winners (from left) Caroline Ward, Amanda Adams, and Emma Leising.

(From left to right) First place winner Amanda Adams, second place winner Emma Leising, third place winner Caroline Ward.

Thank you to the artists in the exhibition and thank you to all who came out to celebrate!

Come see the exhibition! It will be on display until May 13.

Intern of the Week: Caroline Ward

Meet Caroline Ward from Carmel, Indiana

Caroline is a Senior at Miami, majoring in Individualized Studies with concentrations in English & Entrepreneurship, with a minor in Painting. This semester, Caroline is a Marketing Intern at the Miami University Art Museum (MUAM). In addition to interning at MUAM, Caroline is involved with AMSO, the Art Museum Student Organization on campus! Caroline has been working on publicizing Conflict & Resolution: A Student Response Exhibition, and was responsible for the publicity and support of the Conservator Programs with Michael Ruzga.

Caroline one day hopes to have a career as a successful artist. One of her works is currently on display in Conflict & Resolution: A Student Response Exhibition, at MUAM!

Caroline’s favorite arts/culture venues are the Musée du Louvre (Paris, France), and The National Gallery of Art (Washington, D.C.) Her favorite place to eat in Oxford is Graeter’s Ice Cream. In her free time, Caroline enjoys spending time with her family, painting, cooking and reading.

Come see the exhibition and vote for your top three pieces! Voting will continue until today at 5 p.m. and the awards ceremony for exhibited artists will be held on April 13, from 5-7 p.m.

By Ethan Clearfield Arts Management Intern

Artist of the Week: Hannah Edmonds

Meet Hannah Macoy Edmonds, from Hamilton, Ohio!

Hannah Edmonds with her monotype print, Shot (2016).

Hannah is a junior at Miami University, majoring in Printmaking. This semester, Hannah’s work is exhibited in Miami University Art Museum’s Student Response Exhibition (SRE) Conflict & Resolution.

Hannah’s dream job is to be a print shop owner. She enjoys sewing outside of school and loves to go to Taco Bell- her favorite place to eat in Oxford. Her favorite food is pasta! She works at Texas Roadhouse and GameStop. Her favorite animals are bunnies! She has three rabbits, named Hunny, Olaf, and Lola. Hannah’s favorite arts venue in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met) in New York City.

Hannah chose Miami because it is close to home. Her plans after receiving her undergraduate degree include continuing with school and receiving her master’s degree. She would love to use her degree to design quilt fabric patterns, combining her arts degree with her love for sewing.

Come see the exhibition and vote for your top three pieces! Voting will continue until April 12 and the awards ceremony for exhibited artists will be held on April 13, from 5-7pm.

By Caroline Ward, Marketing & Communications Intern

Artist of the Week: Josh Gabbard

Meet Josh Gabbard, from Columbus, Ohio!

Josh Gabbard with his ceramic piece, Connect/Disconnect (2016).

Josh graduated from Miami University in winter 2016 with a degree in Architecture and minor in Art & Architecture History.

Josh’s favorite arts venue is the Tate Modern, in London, England. His favorite place to eat in Oxford, Ohio is La Bodega and his favorite activity outside of school is hiking.

The Student Response Exhibition asked students to artistically think about the idea of conflict and resolution. For Josh Gabbard’s ceramic piece, titled Connect/Disconnect, he states,

“With the unrest of human conflict comes the inevitable struggle to find refuge. Cities, communities and families that were once connected become fragmented, dispersed, divided. The fabric of a whole is no longer composed. Compounding this struggle is the application of borders- geographic, bureaucratic, cultural and psychological notions of division. Identity becomes a determinant of survival within these man-made systems of fragility.”

Josh explores the idea of disconnect and fragmentation caused by conflict. He weaves together ideas of dissonance and community in his piece.

Come see the exhibition and vote for your top three pieces! Voting will continue until April 12 and the awards ceremony for exhibited artists will be held on April 13, from 5-7pm.

By Caroline Ward, Marketing & Communications Intern

Artist of the Week: Rebekah Mohn

Meet Rebekah Mohn, from Fillmore, Missouri!

Rebekah Mohn with her woodblock and monotype print, Commitment to Freedom (2016)

Rebekah is a senior at Miami University, majoring in Botany and minoring in 2-D Media Studies and Molecular Biology. This semester, Rebekah’s work is exhibited in Miami University Art Museum’s Student Response Exhibition (SRE) Conflict & Resolution.

Rebekah’s dream job is to be a plant researcher curating an herbarium. Her favorite arts venue is the St. Louis Art Museum, located in St. Louis, Missouri. Her favorite food is ice cream and her favorite restaurant in Oxford is Phan-Shin! Outside of school, Rebekah enjoys hiking and photography. She is a member of a club on Miami University’s campus called Navigators Student Organization.

Fun Fact: Rebekah and her family own a small farm and raise sheep. Sheep are her favorite animal! Along with sheep, her family has a dog, a cat, and FOUR llamas.

Art has helped Rebekah in her research internship, where she did image analysis of plant parts. She explains that understanding the data behind images sped up the process of manipulating the image to extract the shape information. She says that if she were to ever name a plant species, she would like to produce her own botanical drawing to go with the publication- connecting her passion for art and her passion for science!

Rebekah chose Miami University because of her major and the department culture. She is a part of the Miami University Art Museum because of the Student Response Exhibition. Next fall, Rebekah will be attending the University of Minnesota for graduate school for a PhD in Plant Biology.

Come see the exhibition and vote for your top three pieces! Voting will continue until April 12 and the awards ceremony for exhibited artists will be held on April 13, from 5-7pm.

By Caroline Ward, Marketing & Communications Intern

Conservation at Work

Caroline Ward, Marketing Intern

On March 13 2017, the Miami University Art Museum invited a Cincinnati conservator to speak with faculty, students and the public about art conservation. This event included a presentation on general conservation information, a demonstration on a painting in the museum’s collection by the Italian artist Francesco Bissolo, and a conversation about careers in the conservation field.

Cincinnati conservator Michael Ruzga speaking with Miami University students at the event Conservation at Work on March 13, 2017.

The conservator, Michael Ruzga, explained how conservation works to keep the integrity of the original work by the artist. He showed conservation techniques used on Rembrandt paintings, Seurat panels and Monet’s beach paintings. His discussion covered the change in techniques over time and the way paint had been stored in early times to the present. Did you know paint used to be stored in small animal bladders?

During his visit, Mr. Ruzga discussed conservation topics such as light, cleaning and the different layers of a painting. Light examination, including ultraviolet and infrared, were addressed, as were examples of underlying layers being discovered through light examination. The removal of grime and dirt was one cleaning technique discussed by Mr. Ruzga. Often, paintings need to be cleaned after a certain amount of time. Mr. Ruzga also showed the five layers in the construction of a painting. These layers include the auxiliary support (stretcher or strainer), the canvas (with a weave pattern and weight), the sizing and ground layers (which could be the imprimatura or underdrawing layer), the paint layer (this could be oil, acrylic, tempura, mixed media, etc.), and the varnish and grime layers. All of these layers are important to the  future of the painting, helping conservators determine what steps need to be taken to restore the piece.

Francesco Bissolo (Italian). Madonna and Child, 16th century. Gift of Gregory M. and Jeffrey B. Bishop. Acc. No. 2014.B.E.L.15

Students from many disciplines attended the event. Art history, studio art and science students spoke with Mr. Ruzga about the physical process of conservation as he worked on  Francesco Bissolo’s Madonna and Child, a 16th century Italian painting. He lightly removed a grime layer on the surface to reveal the original sky painted by the artist. It showed a remarkable difference. Students were allowed to step close to the painting to witness the transformation. They asked questions concerning the rules regarding how much can be removed, what determines his decisions and what steps must be taken to protect the painting during transport.

At the end of the presentation, Mr. Ruzga opened up the floor for questions, not only about the conservation process but also the career field.He covered the background most conservators begin with, including education in chemistry, humanities (such as art history, anthropology, architecture, and archaeology), and studio art. After graduation, interested people may look into options such as apprenticeships, internships and post-graduate training to develop the beginning of a conservation career. This career field does not just mean being a conservator. It also offers the option of being a conservation administrator, educator, scientist, technician or preservation specialist.

Thank you to all who came out to the museum and attended the event!

Cincinnati conservator Michael Ruzga demonstrating on the Italian Bissolo painting on March 13, 2017 at the Miami University Art Museum.

Art and Architecture History Capstone Creates an Exhibition and Learns About Careers

Bridget Garnai, Arts Management Intern

Advance/Retreat: Prints and the Great War, one of the current exhibitions for Spring 2017, was created as part of a unique Capstone course for Miami University Art and Architecture History Students. The Capstone course allows upper-level Art and Architecture History students (usually seniors), to use the skills they have learned in their classes to create an exhibition at the Miami University Art Museum (MUAM).

The seven students in this year’s course selected the pieces of art featured in the exhibition from a larger list of prints created around the time of World War I. Art & Architecture History professor and capstone instructor Dr. Pepper Stetler, Curator Jason Shaiman, and Collections Manager/Registrar Laura Stewart selected the original larger list from the museum’s permanent collection and tasked the students with creating an exhibition that tied into the museum’s overall theme for Spring 2017, a commemoration of the United States’ entry into World War I. While making their selections, the students learned about printmaking techniques from printmaking professor Ellen Price, created the themes around which the exhibition would be designed, decided where to place each print within the gallery, chose paint colors and graphic design elements, and designed an educational program to share their work. In addition, the Capstone students each chose two or three prints from the exhibition to research individually. Students then wrote object labels for their respective prints to provide a context for the artist and print, and explain the relevance of each print to the overall theme of the exhibition. Each student also wrote an individual research paper about a larger question or idea based upon one or more of the prints that they chose to research.

The capstone course at their Gallery Talk/Reception in February 2017. (Front row, L-R) Allison Dykes, Kate Hanley, Bridget Garnai. (Back row, L-R) Dr. Pepper Stetler, Rebecca Hughes, Josh Perry, Raechel Root, Aaron Brown-Ewing.

The exhibition was installed in January 2017 and in February 2017, the students gave short presentations of their individual research during a gallery talk and reception. In addition to employing the research and writing skills that the students have developed in their classes, the experience of creating an exhibition with MUAM gave the Capstone students an opportunity to explore museum careers – a popular career path for Art & Architecture History graduates. The Capstone course worked with each department at the museum in the development of Advance/Retreat, allowing the students to learn about the careers of each employee and to see how each staff contribution adds to the creation and presentation of an exhibition, and the mission of the museum.

During a class trip to New York City during Fall Break in October 2016, the students also learned about career options by visiting Miami Art & Architecture History alumni working in NYC. Professor Stetler arranged for the students to visit museums and galleries in NYC, and introduced students to alumni with a variety of careers, including artists, museum professionals, and gallery associates. From these introductions, students were able to make connections with alumni and learn about how to transfer their education and skills into fulfilling careers. The Art & Architecture History Capstone is a unique opportunity for students to practice these skills in the creation of a museum exhibition while learning about museum careers. Thanks to the Miami University Art Museum, the Miami University Department of Art, and the Miami University alumni who met with the class. Best of luck to the Capstone students as they graduate and begin their careers!

Visit Advance/Retreat: Prints and the Great War at the Miami University Art Museum, on view until May 13, 2017.

The capstone students at the Met Breuer in New York City with Miami alumnus Neal Stimler ’06 in October 2016.

Artist of the Week: G M Akand Sabik

Meet G M Akand Sabik, from Bangladesh, Dhaka!

G M Akand Sabik with his photograph, Immurement (2016).

G M Akand Sabik is a sophomore at Miami University, majoring in Mechanical Engineering and minoring in Humanitarian Engineering. This semester, Sabik’s work is exhibited in Miami University Art Museum’s Student Response Exhibition (SRE) Conflict & Resolution.

Sabik’s dream job is to be a photojournalist. His favorite arts venue is a tiny museum in his hometown featuring only works of Zainul Abedin. His favorite food is chicken wings and his favorite place to eat in Oxford is La Bodega! His favorite activity outside of school is trekking and his hobbies include photography and tinkering with devices. Sabik works as a photo contributor with the Miami Student and is also involved with Infocus, the photography club on campus.

Sabik chose Miami University because of the university’s visible ideology of what an undergraduate education should be like, and the scholarships helped with his decision too! He also had a work of art exhibited in the Student Response Exhibition last year. He has two photographs on display in the Miami University Art Museum this semester in the SRE.

Come see the exhibition and vote for your top three pieces! Voting will continue until April 12 and the awards ceremony for exhibited artists will be held on April 13, from 5-7pm.

By Caroline Ward, Marketing & Communications Intern

Artist of the Week: Claudia Tommasi

Meet Claudia Tommasi, from Stow, Ohio!

Claudia Tommasi with her woodcut and monotype print, Collateral Damage (2016).

Claudia Tommasi is a senior at Miami University. She is majoring in Studio Art with concentrations in Printmaking and Painting. She is also minoring in Arts Management, Art History, and Interactive Media Studies. This semester, Claudia’s work is exhibited in Miami University Art Museum’s Student Response Exhibition (SRE) Conflict & Resolution.

Claudia’s dream jobs are being a working artist and also a teaching artist. Her favorite arts venue is the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. Other favorite art venues include The Drawing Center and the Met Breuer in New York. Her favorite food is Korean food and her favorite place to eat in Oxford is Krishna! Her other school activities include being Treasurer of the Art Museum Student Organization (AMSO) on campus and being in the University Academic Scholars Program. She also works as a Student Assistant at Maplestreet Station. There are many reasons Claudia chose Miami University. These include the atmosphere, class size, scholarship opportunities and professors. Claudia’s hobbies are trying new restaurants, Netflix-ing, and Google deep-diving. Outside of school, she enjoys relaxing and exploring new places. She has four cats and one dog, and she really likes guinea pigs (due to their cuteness and potato shape)!

Claudia appreciates the art of the 1950’s and 1960’s, as Americans became more experimental in their artwork. Her main source of research and inspiration come from contemporary artists. These artists include Katharina Grosse, Judy Pfaff and Fabian Marcaccio. She also enjoys the line work and theatrical depictions of post-impressionist painter and printmaker, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

At the Miami University Art Museum, Claudia has worked as a curatorial intern in the summer of 2015. She has exhibited work in other SREs at the museum before and is excited to be exhibiting again.

Come see the exhibition and vote for your top three pieces! Voting will continue until April 12 and the awards ceremony for exhibited artists will be held on April 13, from 5-7pm.

By Caroline Ward, Marketing & Communications Intern

Conservation Conversations: Public and Student Programs

Monday, March 13: Meet the Conservator!  

Conservator Michael Ruzga speaking with the public about the conservation process during his visit to the museum in 2015.

The public is invited to converse with Cincinnati conservator Michael Ruzga at the Miami University Art Museum as he works on a 16th century Italian oil painting. Formerly the Chief Conservator at the Taft Museum of Art, Ruzga has treated numerous paintings over the past twenty years, including works by Rembrandt, Renoir, Bouguereau and others.

The general public will get a chance to speak with Ruzga about the conservation process during “Conservation Conversation.” Co-sponsored by the Art Museum Docent Program, this event will be held on Monday March 13 at 10 am in the Art Museum auditorium. Ruzga will present the process of conservation, his methods, and conduct a treatment demonstration.

Francesco Bissolo (Italian). Madonna and Child. 16th century. Gift of Gregory M. and Jeffrey B. Bishop. Acc. No. 2014.B.E.L.15

Also on March 13 from Noon-1:30 pm, a student and faculty program, “Conservation at Work,” will offer not only a chance to learn about conservation careers, but also lunch. Ruzga will continue to work on the oil painting (left) during this event and be available to answer questions from the audience. This program is co-sponsored by the Miami University Office of Career Services.

Programs co-sponsored by the Miami University Art Museum Docent Program and the Office of Career Services.